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Updated on July 28, 2000


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Combat

Mechanics  |  Weapons & Armor | Saving Throws  |  Miscellaneous


Mechanics:

  • To see Combat in action, take a look at my Combat Examples.
  • Armor Class: Instead of Armor Classes that range from 10 (no armor) to -10 (the best magical armors), the range will run from 10 (no armor) to 30 (the best magical armors) and beyond.  The AC, then, becomes the number you have to roll on a d20 in order to hit.  Bonuses for class and level (and magic and strength and specialization, etc., etc., etc.) are added to the die roll.
  • Armor Class Thirty-Something: WotC's Sean Reynolds confirms what has long been suspected/rumored: "There are no AC limits now. The tarrasque's AC is over 30, for example."
  • A More Correct Combat Bonus Table:  What you see here is the complete 3E Combat Bonus table.
  • The combat round will last 6 seconds, rather than the current 1-minute round in 2E.
  • Initiative info:  Initiative will be rolled on a d20, modified by Dexterity, and high roll goes first.  After rolling for the first round, each character then acts in that same order -- unless they choose to "Delay" their actions (pick a later spot in the initiative order in which to act in the current and subsequent rounds) or "Refocus" (giving up an attack to gain an earlier initiative spot in the cycle).  It sounds as if "casting time" for wizard spells is disappearing, at least if the original 2nd ed. spell had a casting time less than 1 round.  This would make sense, given the fact that weapon speeds will be gone from the rules as well.  So when a wizard casts a spell, it just goes off on his turn in the initiative cycle, unless the casting time is greater than one round.
  • You Must (re)Focus: "When you Refocus, you add 20 to your initiative roll, which will have the effect of allowing you to move "up" in the initative order."
  • Delay: When a character decides to take the "Delay" action, he can act at any time in the round after his current initiative score; once he chooses to act, that new spot in the initiative becomes his initiative score. So for example, say you had a 19 for initiative. You could Delay until 12 and then act; next round your initiative would still be at 12.
  • Initiative and the "Ready" Action: When I posed the question, "Can an attack Readied this round be carried over to the next round when the triggering event takes place?" here's what WotC's Sean Reynolds had to say: Yes. You continue to Ready until your next turn, at which point you can ready again. The difference between lowest number in initiative and the highest is the same as the difference between 10 and 9. Being "high" in the initiative only is relevant in the first round (because of flat-footedness or being able to kill your opponent before they get to counterattack).
  • Some info on the combat round, from Ryan Dancey, VP of TSR: In 3rd Edition, combat is "real time", in that nobody has to make a choice about an action until the moment arrives when it is their turn to act.  This makes combat more unpredictable, but also removes bookkeeping and DM ruling headaches.

3E Combat Bonus Table (revised 5/26/00)

Level

Class

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

Fighter, Paladin, Ranger, Barbarian

+1

+2

+3

+4

+5

+6
+1

+7
+2

+8
+3

+9
+4

+10
+5

+11
+6
+1

+12
+7
+2

+13
+8
+3

+14
+9
+4

+15
+10
+5

+16
+11
+6
+1

+17
+12
+7
+2

+18
+13
+8
+3

+19
+14
+9
+4

+20
+15
+10
+5

Cleric, Druid, Rogue, Bard;
Monk (armed with non-Monkish weapons)

+0

+1

+2

+3

+3

+4

+5

+6
+1

+6
+1

+7
+2

+8
+3

+9
+4

+9
+4

+10
+5

+11
+6
+1

+12
+7
+2

+12
+7
+2

+13
+8
+3

+14
+9
+4

+15
+10
+5

Monk
Unarmed or with Monkish Weapons

+0

+1

+2

+3

+3

+4
+1

+5
+2

+6
+3

+6
+3

+7
+4
+1

+8
+5
+2

+9
+6
+3

+9
+6
+3

+10
+7
+4
+1

+11
+8
+5
+2

+12
+9
+6
+3

+12
+9
+6
+3

+13
+10
+7
+4
+1

+14
+11
+8
+5
+2

+15
+12
+9
+6
+3

Wizard, Sorcerer

+0

+1

+1

+2

+2

+3

+3

+4

+4

+5

+5

+6
+1

+6
+1

+7
+2

+7
+2

+8
+3

+8
+3

+9
+4

+9
+4

+10
+5


How the chart works:
  The numbers that correspond with the character's class and level are bonuses to a d20 roll.  The total of the roll and the bonus (plus bonuses for Strength, Dexterity, Specialization, Magical Items, etc.) is the Armor Class hit. The first number is for the first attack in a round, the second (if present) is for the second attack in the round, the third (if present) is for the third attack, the fourth bonus (if present) is for a fourth attack in a round, and the fifth bonus (only present for Unarmed Monk) is for the fifth attack in a round. So this chart shows not only the attack bonuses, but at what levels the different classes gain multiple attacks.

For Multiclass Characters: Ryan Dancey indicates that a good way to determine if a multiclassed character is eligible for extra attacks is to add up your combat bonuses; if you can subtract 5 and still have a remainder, you get another attack with the remainder as a bonus. So if you've accumulated +6 in bonuses, you get a first attack at +6, and a second at +1. However, later Ryan amended this to mean only class-derived attack bonuses; you don't get to factor in your magic sword or your muscular arms into the equation, at least for figuring if you get multiple attacks. You can see the effect on multiclass characters here (modified versions of Tweedledee and Tweedledum I created a while back). [Same princple applies for the Unarmed Monk chart, except it's -3 for each attack instead of -5.]

Examples:

  • 7th Level Fighter gains two attacks per round -- the first at +7, the second at +2.
  • 14th Level Fighter gains three attacks per round -- the first at +14, the second at +9, and the third at +4.
  • 20th level Wizard gains two attacks per round -- the first at +10, the second at +5.
  • Two-Weapon Fighting Feat: If a character has the Two-Weapon Fighting feat, the "first attack" is really with both the primary and the secondary weapon, each at the bonus for first attack; the second and subsequent attacks are made only with the primary weapon, at the given bonus. Put another way, Two-Weapon Fighting gives the character only one extra attack [with his secondary weapon] at his highest bonus, per round. Of course, there are penalties for fighting with two weapons, and those must be factored in as well, just like any other modifier (ST, magic items, etc.).
    • Two-Weapon Example: A 13th-level Ranger with two-weapon style fighting with long sword (primary weapon) and hand axe (secondary weapon). Not including any other bonuses (for STR, magic items) or penalties (for fighting with two weapons, etc.), the attack sequence for each round will be...
      • Long sword at +13 (first attack)
      • Hand axe at +13 (counts as part of first attack)
      • Long sword at +8 (second attack)
      • Long sword at +3 (third attack)

  • How do you handle multiple attacks with the new initiative system (answered by Der Verdammte)? "Multiple attacks occur all at once, at the character's initiative."
  • Missile Rate of Fire: WotC's Sean Reynolds talks about missile fire: Actually, when you get multiple attacks at higher levels, that applies to missile weapons as well. So a warrior that has 3 attacks per round (because he's 10th level) could make 3 melee or 3 missile attacks. There is a feat called Rapid Fire that allows you to make an additional ranged attack per round.
  • "Critical hits will be handled as follows:  each weapon has a certain score required to roll.  It's not a certain number above the required AC.  Once that required number is rolled you then make a second roll and if you hit a second time you do a critical hit."  So with this system, it will be easier for a skilled fighter to make critical hits, and a lot less likely that an opponent with a normally "untouchable" AC can suffer a critical.
  • Mr. Dancey added to what we know of the new rules for Critical HitsThere are certain times when the "threat range" might expand; say, dealing a threat on a 19 or a 20.  And there are certain times when the damage might be tripled or quadrupled, not just doubled.
  • Unarmed Attacks: WotC's Sean Reynolds talks about weapon-related feats and how they can be used to augment unarmed melee attacks:
    • You can choose "fists" as your finessed when you acquire the Weapon Finesse feat.
    • You can take Improved Critical and choose "fists" when you acquire that feat.
  • Combat Options:
    • The basic combat actions include Attacking, Charging, and Full Attack. Full Attack means making multiple attacks, using a feat or special ability that prevents you from making a partial action or movement in that round.
    • "Miscellaneous actions" include one called a "bull rush" that allows Fighters to push opponents around on the battlefield. Other actions such as disarm, grapple, feint, overrun, and striking a weapon also fall into this "miscellaneous" category.
    • Aid: One of the actions characters can take in combat is called Aid. When you Aid someone, that character can receive a +1 bonus to AC, to hit, or damage.
  • 3E Combat Details: A scooper named "Dagger" reports that he had a chance to take some notes from the 3E demo adventure "Into the Darkness."

ATTACKS OF OPPORTUNITY:

      • You threaten the area next to you, even when it's not your action. An enemy that takes certain actions while in a threatened area provokes an attack of opportunity from you. This is a single attack and you can only make one per round.
      • If you move within or out of a threatened area, you provoke an attack of opportunity (unless all you do is move during your turn).
      • If you move into another threatened space, enemies get an attack of opportunity for leaving the first threatened space and for moving into the second threatened space.
      • Attacking with a ranged weapon provokes an attack of opportunity from enemies next to you.
      • Casting a spell provokes an attack of opportunity from enemies next to you.
      • You can take a 5' adjustment at any time during your action. Doing so does not provoke an attack of opportunity.

CHARGE

      • Characters and monsters can make charge attacks on their actions. When making a charge, you move in a straight line for up to double your speed and then make one attack with a +2 bonus on your attack roll. You suffer a -2 charge penalty to your AC until your next action.

CRITICAL HITS

      • When you roll a natural 20 on your attack roll, you hit regardless of your opponents AC, and you score a threat. To confirm a critical hit, make a critical roll - another attack roll with all of the same modifiers as the roll you just made. If the critical roll hits, your original roll was a critical hit and you can roll damage twice (add both rolls together to get the damage total). If the critical roll misses, you still get a normal hit.
      • Some weapons have a threat range greater than 20 and allow you to score a threat on a lower number.
      • Some weapons deal better than double damage on a critical hit.

FIRING INTO MELEE

      • You suffer a -4 penalty to your ranged attack roll when firing into melee.

FLAT-FOOTED

      • At the start of battle, before you've had a chance to act (before your first regular turn in the initiative order), you are flat-footed. You can't use your DEX bonus to AC while flat-footed, and you can't make attacks of opportunity.
      • Rogues do not lose their DEX bonus to AC when flat-footed.

MOVEMENT

      • Each character has a speed measurement in feet. You can move that distance on your turn and attack or cast a single 1-action spell. You can move before or after attacking or casting.
  • Movement and Position in Combat: WotC's Ryan Dancey drops a few tidbits concerning combat situations:
    • [A character] can move [his full movement rate] and make one melee attack (in other words, if the character could normally make two or more attacks, they forgo that ability to make a full move and attack once). The attack is the "best" attack - no penalties.
    • If you move at a rate higher than your base movement [via actions such as Hustle or Run], you get no attacks. However, Ryan adds, A charge is an attack.
    • [In 3E] "Flanking" means "having an opponent on opposite sides of a figure" - it doesn't refer to any specific direction.
    • If a character chooses a Ready action and the condition is *not* met, what can I do at the end of the round, if anything? Your "ready" action lasts from the time you declare it to the next opportunity you have to take an action. And you can't do anything but wait in a state of extreme readiness.
  • Combat and Movement: WotC's Sean Reynolds on movement in combat:

With a Full Attack action*, you take your attacks in numerical order (highest incremental to lowest incremental) on any targets you can reach. You can take a single 5-foot step before, in between, or after your attacks. You don't need to decide which attack is going against who until it's time to use that attack (so you don't waste attacks on opponents you killed with an earlier blow).

This becomes handy. If you're surrounded by medium-power opponents, and one square back are a couple that havebeen wounded near death, you can use your big attack on an unhurt guy near you, then take a 5-foot step to use a weaker incremental attack on one of the wounded guys, killing him. If you have Cleave, that also means you could Cleave to the other weak guy next to him, possibly killing him, too.

*Note that to get your incremental attacks, you have to use the Full Attack action, which means the only move you can make that round is a 5-foot step.

  • Charge!: “After moving, you may make a single melee attack. Since you can use the momentum of the charge in your favor, you get a +2 bonus on the attack roll. Since a charge is impossible without a bit of recklessness, you also suffer a –2 penalty to your AC for 1 round (generally until your next action).”
  • Combat Reflexes: WotC's Sean Reynolds clarifies that you never get more than one attack of opportunity per round against a given opponent, even if you have the Combat Reflexes feat (which gives you the chance for multiple attacks of opportunity per round -- but against multiple opponents):Even if for some reason a guy could run past you six times in a round, you could only take a free whack at him once. Otherwise it gets really weird (you could attack him with something that provokes an AOO, and he might retaliate with another action that provokes an AOO, and suddenly you have 10 or more attacks going off on each side between two people in a single round).
  • Defense in Combat: WotC's Sean Reynolds mentions ways to give yourself added protection in combat: There is a "fighting defensively" combat option that gives you an AC bonus in exchange for a penalty on your attacks (as well as a "total defense" option that gives you a better bonus without letting you attack). Certain feats improve this option.
  • Damage Reduction: The monster revealed by WotC's Anthony Valterra, the Tyrantfog Zombie, had an unexplained special defense called "damage reduction." Anonymous sources have confirmed that this is the way 3E handles monsters that can only be hit by magical weapons. The entry "Damage Reduction 15/+1" means that each physical attack against this type of zombie is reduced by 15 hp per attack unless the attacker is using a +1 or better weapon. So it's conceivable that if this zombie was attacked by a very skilled and strong warrior, these attacks could be successful, but each hit would do 15 hp less damage than normal unless he had a magic weapon.
  • Size Matters: The size modifiers to AC and attack rolls speculated by Heretic Apostate a few weeks ago on the official 3E Message Board have been confirmed on my message board:

Combat Modifiers by Size

Size Example Modifier Dimension* Weight**
Colossal (great red wyrm) -8 50´+ 150,000 lbs.
Gargantuan (Storm giant) -4 24´+ to 50´ 25,000 lbs. to 150,000 lbs.
Huge (Hill Giant) -2 12´+ to 24´ 3,000 lbs. + to 25,000 lbs.
Large (Ogre) -1 7´+ to 12´ 400 lbs. + to 3,000 lbs.
Medium (Human) 0 4´+ to 7´ 50 lbs. to 400 lbs.
Small (Gnome) +1 2´+ to 4´ 7 lbs. to 50 lbs.
Tiny (Cat) +2 1´+ to 2´ 1 lb.+ to 7 lbs.
Diminutive (Toad) +4 1"+ to 1´ 1/8 lb.+ to 1 lb.
Fine (fly) +8 1" or less 1/8 lb. or less
The modifier applies to the creature's AC and attack rolls. For instance, a gnome has a +1 to hit and a +1 to AC, while a storm giant has a -4 to hit and a -4 AC. Notice that when two creatures of the same size fight each other, the modifiers cancel out (+4 to hit vs. +4 to AC results in a net modifier of +0).

* Biped's height, quadruped's body length (nose to base of tail).
** Assuming that the creature is roughly as dense as a regular animal. A creature made of solid stone will weigh considerably more. A gaseous creature will weigh much less.

  • Here are some sample scenarios, by TSR VP Ryan Dancey, that demonstrate why the "Delay" option for initiative would be useful (scoop sent in by Don Lail):
      ===================

      Two mages, standing side by side.  Fire Giant is running towards them.  Both mages have the same initiative.

      One decides to "delay", the other fires a spell.  If the spell is sufficient to kill the Giant, the second mage can change targets and shoot something else.  If not, the second mage can cast something else at the original Giant.  If they both went on the same initiative, the DM would be justified in ruling that damage would be made after both mages cast spells - so one might waste a spell on a target that would have been stopped by the other.

      ==================

      Two mages, opposing each other.  Neither knows the level of the other.  There's a battle going on, and having powerful spells available may mean the difference between success and failure.

      Mage One would go first in the initiative order, but takes a risk and "Delays".  Mage Two fires her best spell - a four bolt magic missile.  Mage One takes the hit, smiles, makes a concentration roll to cast through the pain, knows her opponent is 4th level, and unleashes the fireball - not the meteor swarm. [Note -- Ryan later corrected his statement -- a 4th level wizard doesn't get four magic missiles.]

      ==================

      Two Rouges are near a monster.  Rogue One is close enough to make a melee attack.  Rogue One has first initiative, the monster second, Rogue Two third.

      Rogue One elects to "delay".  The monster strikes, Rogue One takes the hit. Rogue Two takes a partial movement action - moving a short distance while still being able to make a melee attack - into a "bracketing position" vs. the monster (in other words, there's a character on either side of the monster).  Under 3e rules, that means that either character can make a "sneak attack".  Since Rogue Two moved before attacking, he'll only get one attack this round.

      Rogue Two completes the partial action, and delivers a sneak attack to the monster.  The monster howls as the multiplied damage rends fur and bone.  Then Rogue One makes a melee attack; since Rogue One waited for the creature to be bracketed, Rogue One's attack is also a "sneak attack".  Since Rogue One didn't do anything else this turn (except Delay), Rogue One makes an "All Out Attack" (uses all available attack routines).  Since Rogue One has three attacks, all three are "sneak attacks", and Rogue One delivers leathal damage.  (We won't mention the Critical Hit in the middle...)

      ==================

Weapons & Armor:

  • You can read an exerpt from the Player's Handbook equipment chapter. Here are the weapon-related highlights:
    • Weapon Categories: Weapons are grouped into several interlocking sets of categories. These categories pertain to what skill is needed to be proficient in their use (simple, martial, and exotic), usefulness in close combat (melee) or at a distance (ranged, which includes both thrown and projectile), and weapon size (Tiny, Small, Medium-size, and Large).
      • Simple, Martial, and Exotic Weapons: Anybody but a druid, monk, rogue, or wizard is proficient with all simple weapons. Barbarians, fighters, paladins, and rangers are proficient with all simple and all martial weapons. Characters of other classes are proficient with an assortment of mainly simple weapons and possibly also some martial or even exotic weapons. If you use a weapon with which you are not proficient, you suffer a –4 penalty on attack rolls.
      • Melee and Ranged Weapons: Melee weapons are used for making melee attacks, though some of them can be thrown as well. Ranged weapons are thrown weapons or projectile weapons that are not effective in melee. You apply your Strength bonus to damage dealt by thrown weapons but not to damage dealt by projectile weapons (except for mighty composite shortbows or longbows).
      • Tiny, Small, Medium-Size, and Large Weapons: The size of a weapon compared to your size determines whether for you the weapon is light, one-handed, two-handed, or too large to use.
        • Light: If the weapon’s size category is smaller than yours (such as a human using a Small weapon), then the weapon is light for you. Light weapons are easier to use in your off hand, and you can use them while grappling. You can use a light weapon in one hand. You get no special bonus when using it in two hands.
        • One-Handed: If the weapon’s size category is the same as yours (such as a human using a rapier), then the weapon is one-handed for you. If you use a one-handed melee weapon two-handed, you can apply one and a half times your Strength bonus to damage (provided you have a bonus). Thrown weapons can only be thrown one-handed, and you receive your Strength bonus to damage.
        • Two-Handed: If the weapon’s size category is one step larger than your own (such as a human using a greataxe), then the weapon is two-handed for you. You can use a two-handed melee weapon effectively in two hands, and when you deal damage with it, you add one and a half times your Strength bonus to damage (provided you have a bonus).
        • Too Large to Use: If the weapon’s size category is two or more steps larger than your own (such as a gnome trying to use a greatsword), the weapon is too large for you to use.
  • Weapons will do the same amount of damage regardless of the size of the opponent.
  • Some weapons (i.e. a quarterstaff, dwarven urgrosh, orc double axe) can be used to make extra attacks in the same round, but with a penalty for each attack as if attacking with two weapons.

Dwarven Urgrosh?

The April "Countdown to 3rd Edition" column in Dragon Magazine mentions a weapon called the "dwarven urgrosh." According to the article, it falls into the Exotic weapon category. Like many other Exotic weapons, the urgrosh has a special effect. "... the urgrosh is a double weapon. A fighter using one can make an extra attack as if with a second weapon, but treating it as if it were made by a light weapon, for a reduced off-hand penalty."

This illustration accompanied the Fighter article. Whether this dwarf is holding a "dwarven urgrosh" or not is anyone's guess. But given that blade at the bottom, it sure looks like a "double weapon" to me! :)

  • On firearms:  "The PHB doesn't list firearms.  The DMG will treat the subject briefly."
  • Sleeping in Armor: If you sleep in a suit of armor with an armor check penalty of -5 or worse (see table below), you are automatically fatigued the next day. You suffer a -2 penalty on Strength and Dexterity, and you can't charge or run.

3E Armor Table (Partial) (updated 7/26/00) (Items in Gold are confirmed)

Armor (Cost)

Type

Armor Bonus

Max Dex Bonus

Armor Check Penalty

Arcane Failure

Speed

Wt

Buckler (15 gp)

Shield

+1

--

-1

+5%

n/a

5

Shield, Small Steel (9 gp)

Shield

+1

--

-1

+5%

n/a

6

Shield, Large Steel (20 gp)

Shield

+2

--

-2

+15%

n/a

15


Padded (5 gp)

Light

+1

+8

0

5%

30/20

5

Leather (10 gp)

Light

+2

+6

0

10%

30/20

15

Studded Leather (25 gp)

Light

+3

+5

-1

15%

30/20

20

Chain Shirt (100 gp)

Light

+4

+4

-2

20%

30/20

25


Hide (15 gp)

Medium

+3

+4

-3

20%

20/15

25

Scale Mail (50 gp)

Medium

+4

+3

-4

25%

20/15

30

Chainmail (150 gp)

Medium

+5

+2

-5

30%

20/15

40

Breastplate (200 gp)

Medium

+5

+3

-4

25%

20/15

30


Splint Mail (200 gp)

Heavy

+6

+0

-7

40%

20/15

45

Banded Mail (250 gp)

Heavy

+6

+1

-6

35%

20/15

45

Half Plate (600 gp)

Heavy

+7

+0

-7

40%

20/15

50

Full Plate (1500 gp)

Heavy

+8

+1

-6

35%

20/15

50

  • Armor Bonus is a bonus added to the base unarmored AC of 10. The more bonuses you get (not only from armor, but from shields, high DEX, magical items, feats/skills, etc.), the better your AC is. ACs will range from 10 to 30 and beyond. So Studded Leather and a Large Shield provide a total of +5 in bonuses, and assuming no other adjustments would add up to an AC of 15.
  • Type: Each Armor is either Light, Medium, Heavy, or a Shield. Each armor type requires armor proficiency. Fighters, for instance, start out proficient in all armors and shields, while rangers start out proficient in Light and Medium armors and shields. Characters who wear armor they're not proficient in will suffer aditional penalties (see Armor Check Penalty below). Normally, when a character Runs, he runs at x4 normal speed; in Heavy armors Running is only at x3 normal speed.
  • Max Dex Bonus is a cap to AC bonuses the character would otherwise receive for high Dexterity.  "This number is the maximum Dexterity bonus to AC that this type of armor allows. Heavier armors limit your mobility, reducing your ability to dodge blows. For example, chainmail permits a maximum Dexterity bonus of +2. A character with a Dexterity score of 18 normally gains a +4 bonus to his AC, but if he is wearing chainmail, his bonus drops to +2. His final Armor Class would be 17 (10 + 5 + 2 = 17), assuming he has no other modifiers. (The +5 is the chainmail and the +2 is his maximum Dexterity bonus)
    Even if your Dexterity bonus drops to 0, you are not considered to have lost your Dexterity bonus. For example, a rogue can't sneak attack you just because you're wearing your half-plate."
  • Armor Check Penalty: This number is a "penalty you apply to certain skill checks. If you're wearing any armor heavier than leather, you can't climb, sneak, or tumble as well as you would if you weren't wearing such heavy armor. This penalty applies to Balance, Climb, Escape Artist, Hide, Jump, Move Silently, Pick Pockets, and Tumble checks. Swim checks face a similar penalty based on the weight of the gear you are carrying and wearing." If you wear armor you aren't proficient with, the Armor Check Penalty applies to all movement-related skills (including Ride) and to attack rolls.
  • Arcane Failure -- Wearing armor will be possible for arcane spellcasters, but if you cast a spell with a Somatic component (which most spells have) there's a chance of spell failure (even if your character has the appropriate armor proficiency). Why is this expressed in percentage terms instead of in "3 in 20" terms? It's to keep players from thinking that this is a Difficulty Class that can be adjusted by high ability scores.
  • Speed: The armor you wear sets your speed, which is in turn dependent on your size. Normally, when a character Runs, he runs at x4 normal speed; in Heavy armors Running is only at x3 normal speed.
  • Weight: In number of pounds. Armor made for a size Small character weighs half the listed value.

3E Weapon Table (Partial) (updated 6/27/00)

Name

Type

Cost (gp)

Range

Damage

Crit
Range

Crit
Effect

Weight

Sz

Type

Finesse
?

Notes

Axe, Throwing

Martial

8

10'

d6

20

x2

4

S

S

Yes

 

Battle Axe

Martial

10

 

d8

20

x3

7

M

S

 

 

Club

Simple

0

10'

d6

20

x2

3

M

B

 

 

Crossbow, Heavy

Simple

50

120'

d10

19

x2

9

M

P

 

Loading is a full-round action which provokes attacks of opportunity.

Crossbow, Light

Simple

35

80'

d8

19

x2

6

S

P

 

Loading is a move-equivalent action which provokes attacks of opportunity.

Dagger

Simple

2

10'

d4

19

x2

1

T

P

Yes

 

Flail, Light

Martial

8

 

d8

20

x2

5

M

B

 

Trip attacks; +2 on Disarm

Great Axe

Martial

20

 

d12

20

x3

20

L

S

 

 

Great Club

Martial

5

 

d10

20

x2

10

L

B

 

 

Greatsword

Martial

50

 

2d6

19

x2

15

L

S

 

 

Halberd

Martial

10

 

d10

20

x3

15

L

S/P

 

Set against charge: x2 damage. Trip attacks.

Halfspear

Simple

1

20'

d6

20

x3

3

M

P

 

Set against charge: x2 damage.

Hammer, Light

Martial

1

20'

d4

20

x2

2

S

B

Yes

 

Hand Axe

Martial

6

 

d6

20

x3

5

S

S

Yes

 

Heavy Flail

Martial

15

 

d10

19

x2

20

L

B

 

 

Heavy Lance

Martial

10

 

d8

20

x3

10

M

P

 

 

Javelin

Simple

1

30'

d6

20

x2

2

M

P

 

Melee: -4 Attack penalty.

Long Bow

Martial

75

100'

d8

20

x3

3

L

P

 

2H; too big to use while mounted.

Longspear

Martial

5

 

d8

20

x3

9

L

P

 

Threatens 10' away; not "close". Set against charge: x2 damage.

Longsword

Martial

15

 

d8

19

x2

4

M

S

 

 

Mace, Heavy

Simple

12

 

d8

20

x2

12

M

B

 

 

Morningstar

Simple

8

 

d8

20

x2

8

M

B/P

 

 

Nunchaku

Exotic

2

 

d6

20

x2

2

S

B

Yes

Monkish weapon.

Pick, Heavy

Martial

8

 

d6

20

x4

6

M

P

 

 

Quarterstaff

Simple

0

 

d6 / d6

20

x2

4

L

B

 

Attack as if fighting w/ two weapons.

Rapier

Martial

20

 

d6

18

x2

3

M

P

Yes

 

Siangham

Exotic

3

 

d6

20

x2

1

S

P

Yes

Monkish weapon.

Siangham, Halfling

Exotic

2

 

d4

20

x2

1

T

P

Yes

Monkish weapon.

Sap

Martial

1

 

d6

20

x2

3

S

B

Yes

Knockout damage.

Scimitar

Martial

15

 

d6

18

x2

4

M

S

 

 

Short Bow

Martial

30

60'

d6

20

x3

2

M

P

 

2H. Can use mounted if Medium size.

Shortspear

Simple

2

20'

d8

20

x3

5

L

P

 

Set against charge: x2 damage.

Shortsword

Martial

10

 

d6

19

x2

3

S

P

Yes

 

Shuriken

Exotic

1

10'

1

20

x2

0.1

T

P

 

Three shuriken per attack; no STR bonus.

Sling

Simple

0

50'

d4

20

x2

0

S

B

 

Bullets; w/ Stones, d3 damage, -1 to hit.

Sword, Two-Bladed

Exotic

100

 

d8 / d8

19

x2

30

L

S

 

Attack as if fighting w/ two weapons.

Warhammer

Martial

12

 

d8

20

x3

8

M

B

 

 

Waraxe, Dwarven

Exotic

30

 

d10

20

x3

15

M

S

 

2H.

  • Weapons and Armor:
    • There are three categories of weapons: Simple, Martial, and Exotic. Simple weapons might include things like the quarterstaff and the crossbow. Martial weapons could include weapons such as swords and lances. Exotic weapons include bastard sword, dwarven waraxe, spiked chain, dire flail, and "dwarven urgrosh." Exotic weapons may deal out more damage, or may have some other special effect.
      • You Bastard ... Sword: Why is the bastard sword considered an "exotic" weapon? Der Verdammte sheds some light: "A bastard sword can be used as a martial weapon if it's used two-handed. If it's used one-handed, there's a penalty unless the character has it as an exotic weapon."
    • Fighters must take the Exotic Weapon Proficiency feat in order to gain proficiency in one Exotic weapon.
    • There are four categories of armor: light, medium and heavy armor, and shields. Fighters begin with proficiency in all types of armor and shields.
  • Armor Proficiency: What happens when a character wears a type of armor she is not proficient in? Anonymous explains: "Remember the 'check penalty' column for studded leather? If you are not proficient in an armor type you suffer this penalty on all attack rolls and all skill rolls that require movement. So you can get away with wearing lighter armor without being proficient a lot easier then using the heavier armors which can have mods of minus 5 or 6 or more." So for example, Studded Leather has a "Check Penalty" of -1, so a character who is not proficient in Light Armors would suffer a -1 to hit and to movement skills like Running, Swimming, Climbing and Jumping. By comparison, Full Plate (a Heavy Armor) has a "Check Penalty" of -6. As we've seen, some characters get some or all of the Armor Proficiencies (Light, Medium and Heavy) for free, while others must acquire them as Feats.
  • Weapon Specialization is a feat only available to Fighters. Its requirement is Weapon Focus (+1 attack bonus with one particular weapon) and a +4 base attack. Weapon Specialization grants +2 to damage to all melee attacks with the chosen weapon, or if a missile weapon, +2 to damage if within point blank range.
  • Sometimes You Need a Little (Weapon) Finesse: If the Weapon Finesse feat allows you to use your high DEX bonuses to improve your melee attack rolls, and having a high DEX also grants bonuses for AC, missile attacks, and Initiative, why should anyone with a high DEX not take Weapon Finesse? Sean Reynolds speaks:
      • Because you can't pick Weapon Finesse just any weapons.
      • Because there are drawbacks to using Weapon Finesse.
      • Because Weapon Finesse doesn't apply to all weapons (no, I am not simply restating my first sentence).

So not only do you have to take a separate Weapon Finesse feat for each weapon (which we knew), but you won't be able to use certain weapons with finesse at all, apparently.

  • Finesse: Here's a list of the weapons that can be used with the Finesse feat (of course, you must take the Finesse feat for each weapon you'd like to use in this manner): Armor Spikes, Throwing Axe, Spiked Chain, Dagger, Gauntlet (normal, Locked and Spiked), Light Hammer, Hand Axe, Kama, Kukri, Light Lance, Light Mace, Nunchaku, Light Pick, Rapier, Siangham, Sap, Shield Spikes, Short Sword, Sickle, Unarmed.
  • Two-Handed Style:
    • Weapon Sizes: First off, it's important to know that characters and monsters are rated by size (small = halfling, medium = human, large = ogre, etc.) and that weapons are likewise rated by size (tiny = dagger, small = short sword, medium = long sword, etc.). A character can use a weapon of equivalent size in one hand; a weapon of one size larger must be wielded in two hands. So for example, a halfling (small) can wield a short sword (small) one-handed, but a long sword (medium) must be wielded two-handed. However, the halfling could also choose to wield the short sword two-handed to cause extra damage (see below). A character cannot wield a weapon that is two sizes larger than him.
    • STR Damage Bonuses for One Weapon in Two Hands: A character who wields one weapon two-handed gets 1.5 times the normal STR damage bonus. However, this only works if the weapon is the same size category as the character, or one size larger. So for example, it doesn't help a human (medium) to wield a dagger (tiny) or a short sword (small) two-handed.
  • Two-Weapon Style:
    • STR Damage Bonuses for Two-Weapon Fighting: Characters who wield two weapons gain their full STR damage bonus for their primary weapon, and half the bonus for their off-hand weapon. The Ambidexterity feat allows characters the full STR damage bonus with the off-hand weapon.
    • Two-Weapon Attack Penalties: The base penalties for attacking with two weapons are -6/-10 (primary weapon / off-hand weapon). However, after applying these penalties, the following situations can lessen the penalties:
      • +0 primary / +4 off-hand if you have Ambidexterity feat
      • +2 primary / +2 off-hand if you have Two-Weapon Fighting feat
      • +2 primary / +2 off-hand if the off-hand weapon is "smaller than you" (a short sword or dagger for a human; a dagger for a halfling, etc.)
    • Feat Summary: In summary, here is what feats can help with two-weapon fighting:
      • Ambidexterity reduces the off-hand attack penalty by 4 and allows full STR damage bonus for the off-hand weapon.
      • Two-Weapon Fighting reduces the primary and off-hand penalties by 2 each.
      • Improved Two-Weapon Fighting gives the wielder an extra attack with the off-hand weapon at a -5 to hit. Normally, the off-hand weapon can only strike once per round regardless of the level of the character or how many attacks he gets per round with the primary weapon. This feat has a number of requirements.
  • No Fumbles: Playtester Der Verdammte informs us: "There are no fumbles in 'official' D&D, though there are [optional] rules for them in the DMG." So while a "1" might be a miss, it isn't necessarily a "critical miss" or "fumble" unless the DM says so.
  • About so-called weapon balance (response to a comment about weapon speed factors no longer being used): "Some weapons are strictly better than others. That's OK; it rewards characters who have access to better weapons (like fighters). You may be able to use feats or class abilities to mitigate some weapon differences or get more buck out of your dagger, but generally the long sword is a superior choice."
  • Weapon Damage has been made uniform so that all weapons deal an even die of damage. There will be no weapons that deal d4+1 or d6+1 damage. This way, you can instantly tell in the stat block if there are bonuses (from Strength or magic, etc.) -- any plus is from some sort of bonus.
  • On missile weapon ranges: the range listed is actually a "range increment" -- so for the short spear, for example, the first 20' is no penalty, the second 20' has a small penalty, the third 20' has a larger penalty, etc. Anonymous didn't provide specific details about the penalites for each range increment, but indicated the penalties range from -2 to -10.
  • Crossbow Loading Times: Light x-bow: loading is a move equivalent action, Heavy x-bow: full round, Repeating x-bow: full-round, Hand x-bow: mv. equivalent. (Presumably a "move equivalent action" means that you can reload and still get off one attack, just like you can move and still get off one attack in a round.)
  • Double Weapons: A quarterstaff is a double weapon.... You can fight with it as if fighting with two weapons, but if you do, you incur all the normal attack penalties associated with fighting with two weapons: a one handed weapon and a light weapon. A creature using a double weapon in one hand, such as an ogre using a two bladed sword, can't use it as a double weapon.
  • Weapons with Reach: In a column called the Weapons Rack, D&D Creative Director Ed Stark gives us a glimpse at what makes the Longspear a useful and deadly weapon: ...the longspear has a reach of 10 feet. In many cases, that means a fighter or other character wielding a longspear can attack an opponent before his opponent can attack him. It's a great way to keep creatures with nasty melee attacks (like ghouls and their paralyzing touch) at bay. It can also help a fighter deal with opponents who also have reach--instead of walking through a giant's "threatened area" and incurring an attack of opportunity, the fighter with the longspear can trade blows with the creature evenly.
  • Reach and Attacks of Opportunity: WotC's Ryan Dancey describes two elements of 3E combat that are sure to make it more realistic than the core 2E rules:

Attacks of Opportunity: You're standing toe to toe with an orc, exchanging blows. You get hit, and realize you're way low on hit points. Acting quickly, you pull out a potion of healing and toss it down in one swallow; ready to return to battle. In 2e, that's exactly what would happen per the rules.

In 3e, when you pull out that potion and drink it, you're not paying complete attention to the orc right in your face - he gets a free swing at you for "dropping your guard". Maybe you should run away first before you go for the potion. Maybe you should try one more attack and see if you can take the orc down and remove the threat. In any event, the tactics of combat got more complex by adding one very small rule to the mix.
[That's "complex" in a good way! ;-) ]

Reach: Imagine you're facing a Fire Giant. Why does the Giant let you run right up to his ankles before attacking you? Imagine you're the golf-ball, and his club is the driver! With "Reach", the Giant can start hitting you with melee attacks before you can hit him; simulating the effects of his much larger size.

Also, imagine how much cooler it will be to have a long pike or pole-arm. If you're in the second row behind the front-line fighters, and you have a weapon with "Reach", you can still attack the opponents facing the front line!

Also, imagine that you're being attacked by monsters with a touch-attack (like level draining, perhaps). If your party uses weapons with "Reach", you can attempt to kill any monster that comes near -
before they're in range to use their touch-attacks!

Adding the element of "Reach" means combat does a better job of addressing size differences and it allows us to make weapon selection more interesting; again, by adding a small, lightweight rule to the game.

  • Masterwork Weapons: "Masterwork weapons" aresuperior quality weapons that grant a non-magical +1 bonus to hit.
  • Futuristic Weapons: Playtester John Troy indicates that there is information about "guns and futuristic weapons" presented in the 3E DMG. John figures, "If the DMG deals with fire, drowning, starvation, falling, falling into lava, ice, poison, etc., you gotta know that they'll also need to provide a baseline for anything else the players might encounter. Which may include a space-ship, a time travel adventure, ancient artifacts, etc."
  • Weapons:  TSR VP Ryan Dancey was quoted on  DND-L discussing weapon choice, particularly what factors will play into keeping character from picking the most damaging weapons (thanks to George Harris for the scoop):

    1)    The class you're playing may not allow you to use that weapon without incurring substantial penalties.  Setting aside that issue (which clarifies the need for perhaps half the weapons on the equipment list), let us examine a few special cases:

    2)    Some races get bonuses with some weapons.  In the hands of a Dwarf, Weapon X may not be the "best" weapon, because Dwarves get additional bonuses with Weapon Y.

    3)    You will be making a tradeoff between using a weapon one handed or two handed.  Some weapons can only be used two handed, or only do maximum damage two handed.  Thus, you won't be able to use a shield.  In 3e, this is a tough choice, as opposed to 2e, where shields were always the suboptimal selection.

    4)    Maybe you have a magic weapon that has bonuses or abilities that provide a net effect greater than the nonmagical alternatives.

    5)    Perhaps you are interested in delivering nonlethal damage, or disarming an opponent, or being able to use a weapon while grappling - all these choices may restrict your weapon selection.

    6)    Style, baby.

    7)    There are some Feats and/or Skills that allow certain types of attacks with certain types of weapons (like charging while mounted, for example) that may require you to use a certain type of weapon in a certain type of attack.

Saving Throws:

  • There are three categories for saving throws:  Reflex (dodge, area effect spells), Will (mind-influence, charms), and Fortitude (poison, etc.).  There will be a base number to achieve (DC or Difficulty Class, e.g. a target number), and then as characters go up in level they will receive bonuses to the die roll.
  • Playtester Der Verdammte had some interesting things to say about Saving Throws in 3E (on the TSR Message Board):
    Fortitude saves are saves that require you to have physically resisted an effect.  If the saving throw is against a spell that (for instance) turns your bones into jelly, a fortitude save is probably appropriate.  But the fortitude save is not a general licence for you to resist damage.

If the save is for half damage, or a save indicates that you've dodged or partially dodged an effect (or a trap, or whatever), a Reflex is called for.

If the save requires mental resistance (certain old saves vs. PPD, or saves vs. spells which applied the character's wisdom modifier), a Will save is appropriate.

Once you see the info, you'll understand.  Saves are always specified in the rules, and there are excellent guidelines in the conversion document for figuring out what save is appropriate for a given effect (not that an intelligent person couldn't figure that out anyway, given knowledge of 2e and 3e rules, though).

  • DCs for Spell Saving Throws: Setting the Difficulty Class for a spell saving throw is one of the big mysteries of the 3E rules -- or it was, until now:

The DC [for a spell] is 10 + the level of the spell + the [Int or Wis or Cha] modifier of the caster. That's it. So a wizard with an Intelligence of 14 (+2) casting a fireball (+3) will create a fireball that needs to be saved vs. Reflex against a DC of 15.

Intelligence would modify DCs for Wizard spells, Wisdom would modify DCs for Cleric and Druid spells, and Charisma would do the same for Bard and Sorcerer spells. Of course, each spell will indicate whether the save is a Will, Reflex or Fortitude save. In addition, "Casters can adjust the saving throw number, too, using a feat."

  • Saving Throw Charts: Here are the Saving Throw Charts derived from the Character Close-ups (thanks to Zimbel42 for the great analysis). The bonuses are to a d20 roll; the result needs to be equal to or greater than the Difficulty Class for that saving throw. Difficulty Classes will vary by the source of the danger (i.e. a mild poison might have a Fortitude DC of 10, while a spell cast by a wizard might have a Will DC of 25):

Cleric & Druid Saving Throw Chart (by Zimbel42)

Level

Fortitude

Reflex

Will

1

+2

+0

+2

2

+3

+0

+3

3

+3

+1

+3

4

+4

+1

+4

5

+4

+1

+4

6

+5

+2

+5

7

+5

+2

+5

8

+6

+2

+6

9

+6

+3

+6

10

+7

+3

+7

11

+7

+3

+7

12

+8

+4

+8

13

+8

+4

+8

14

+9

+4

+9

15

+9

+5

+9

16

+10

+5

+10

17

+10

+5

+10

18

+11

+6

+11

19

+11

+6

+11

20

+12

+6

+12

Wizard & Sorcerer Saving Throw Chart (by Zimbel42)

Level

Fortitude

Reflex

Will

1

+0

+0

+2

2

+0

+0

+3

3

+1

+1

+3

4

+1

+1

+4

5

+1

+1

+4

6

+2

+2

+5

7

+2

+2

+5

8

+2

+2

+6

9

+3

+3

+6

10

+3

+3

+7

11

+3

+3

+7

12

+4

+4

+8

13

+4

+4

+8

14

+4

+4

+9

15

+5

+5

+9

16

+5

+5

+10

17

+5

+5

+10

18

+6

+6

+11

19

+6

+6

+11

20

+6

+6

+12

Monk Saving Throw Chart

Level

Fortitude

Reflex

Will

1

+2

+2

+2

2

+3

+3

+3

3

+3

+3

+3

4

+4

+4

+4

5

+4

+4

+4

6

+5

+5

+5

7

+5

+5

+5

8

+6

+6

+6

9

+6

+6

+6

10

+7

+7

+7

11

+7

+7

+7

12

+8

+8

+8

13

+8

+8

+8

14

+9

+9

+9

15

+9

+9

+9

16

+10

+10

+10

17

+10

+10

+10

18

+11

+11

+11

19

+11

+11

+11

20

+12

+12

+12

Fighter Saving Throw Chart
(also Ranger, Paladin, and Barbarian)

Level

Fortitude

Reflex

Will

1

+2

+0

+0

2

+3

+0

+0

3

+3

+1

+1

4

+4

+1

+1

5

+4

+1

+1

6

+5

+2

+2

7

+5

+2

+2

8

+6

+2

+2

9

+6

+3

+3

10

+7

+3

+3

11

+7

+3

+3

12

+8

+4

+4

13

+8

+4

+4

14

+9

+4

+4

15

+9

+5

+5

16

+10

+5

+5

17

+10

+5

+5

18

+11

+6

+6

19

+11

+6

+6

20

+12

+6

+6

Rogue Saving Throw Chart (by Zimbel42)

Level

Fortitude

Reflex

Will

1

+0

+2

+0

2

+0

+3

+0

3

+1

+3

+1

4

+1

+4

+1

5

+1

+4

+1

6

+2

+5

+2

7

+2

+5

+2

8

+2

+6

+2

9

+3

+6

+3

10

+3

+7

+3

11

+3

+7

+3

12

+4

+8

+4

13

+4

+8

+4

14

+4

+9

+4

15

+5

+9

+5

16

+5

+10

+5

17

+5

+10

+5

18

+6

+11

+6

19

+6

+11

+6

20

+6

+12

+6

Bard Saving Throw Chart

Level

Fortitude

Reflex

Will

1

+0

+2

+2

2

+0

+3

+3

3

+1

+3

+3

4

+1

+4

+4

5

+1

+4

+4

6

+2

+5

+5

7

+2

+5

+5

8

+2

+6

+6

9

+3

+6

+6

10

+3

+7

+7

11

+3

+7

+7

12

+4

+8

+8

13

+4

+8

+8

14

+4

+9

+9

15

+5

+9

+9

16

+5

+10

+10

17

+5

+10

+10

18

+6

+11

+11

19

+6

+11

+11

20

+6

+12

+12

 


Miscellaneous:

  • Movement rates, given in feet per round (the new six-second combat round) will be dependent on the size of the creature or character moving:  T=10 ; S=20 ; M=30 ; L=40 ; H=50 ; G=60. Barbarians have a skill that grant them a +10 to their movement rate. Encumbrance and armor worn will impact movement rate.
  • More details about combat movement rates:  "The basic tactical movement rate for an unencumbered human is now given as 30 feet per round. A character can choose to hustle, which doubles his or her movement rate to 60 feet per round. A character can also choose to run, which raises his or her movement rate to three times the basic rate if the character is wearing heavy armor or four times the basic rate if the character is wearing light, medium, or no armor."
  • Size Categories: You're probably aware that both weapons and creatures are categorized into size categories such as Small, Medium and Large. Here's a more complete list of the size categories, from smallest to largest: Fine, Diminutive, Tiny, Small, Medium, Large, Huge, Gargantuan, Colossal.
  • On unarmed combat:  "In 3e, you can attempt to trip (and be tripped), you can attempt to knock over or over run a target in a charge, you can attack weapons and armor, you can attempt to disarm, you can grapple, you can overbear (including an attempt to hold prone), and your party (or the monsters) can gang up to accomplish a grapple or overbearing attempt as a group.  If grappled, you can attempt to break free, you can attempt to reverse the grapple and overbear the person who is grappling you (including an attempt to hold prone).  You can deliver non-lethal damage barehanded, or for a small penalty, deliver "real" damage.  When grappled, you can fight with small weapons, provided you can reach and use them.  There are skills that provide a taste of martial arts, including some skills that require the user to have mastered a previous, less powerful move first.  All of these abilities are handled using the same system as attacks, skill checks, saving throws, etc:  Roll a d20, add some modifiers, and compare to a Difficulty Class (DC).  Sometimes the DC is an "opposed roll" made by the target of the attack, other times, it's a value based on how hard it is to accomplish the effect you're seeking, and other times the DC is equal to the AC of the target."
  • Can characters knock opponents unconscious instead of killing them in 3E?
    • Ryan Dancey:  Yes.  And be worried: There are monsters that will actively seek to do it to the PCs to either feed at liesure or ransom heroes back to their friends.
  • Can different fighting styles be created with unique flavors?
    • Sean Reynolds:  That's largely covered by the feats & skills that you take. For example, my dwarf fighter in Chris Perkins' game is trained to take out large numbers of derro. He has combat options (feats and skills) that let him attack first from a hidden position, strike even if he can't see, do extra damage at the expense of a penalty to hit (handy if you know you're going to be able to hit them but want to do enough damage to put them down in one hit), and the ability to take out more than one weak creature per round (came in handy last night fighting zombies & grimlocks, actually).  Another person could build a character to take advantage of a higher Dex, dodging around and in between opponents, hitting several opponents per round, and jumping back out before she can be hit. You can also focus on mounted combat, disarming, etc., or combinations of the above. If you want to put a _name_ to a particular combo of feats ("feat package"?) in your campaign you could easily do so, and actually that would be pretty cool (I can see a character template for a particular fighting school from one region giving you a "path" for the feats and skills to take...).
  • Traps: Like monsters, traps in 3E have stat blocks. a trap's stats will tell you what you need to find and disable it. For instance, a pit trap's stat block might look like this: 20-foot-deep pit: Dmg 2d6; Reflex save negates (DC 15); Search (DC 20); Disable Device (DC 20). Traps will be detailed in the DMG.
  • Poisons: Poisons are handled a little differently. Gone are the A-ZZ designations. Poisons now have names, like "giant centipede venom." The new poisons are much cooler than the old ones. Even aside from the nifty names, the effects are much more interesting than mere hp damage, most of the time. And some of them are far deadlier in unexpected ways.
  • Turning Undead Primer: One of the best-kept secrets of 3E is the mechanism for the Cleric's ability to Turn Undead. Here's the scoop:
    • How Often Can It Be Tried? A Cleric can attempt to Turn Undead a number of times per day equal to 3 + Cleric's CHA bonus. This can be increased with the Extra Turning feat.
    • What's the Area of Effect? The Cleric must present his holy symbol (or divine focus) forcefully. Turning affects undead within 60'.
    • What Kind are Turned? A Charisma check (d20+CHA bonus) is used to determine the most powerful type of undead that can be turned with this particular attempt. Consult the chart below:

CHA
Check
Max HD Affected
up to 0 cleric's level - 4
1-3
..cleric's level - 3
4-6
..cleric's level - 2
7-9
..cleric's level - 1
10-12 cleric's level
13-15 cleric's level + 1
16-18 cleric's level + 2
19-21 cleric's level + 3
22+
..cleric's level + 4

Example: Jozan (a 1st-level cleric with CHA 12) gets a rolls a 12 on a d20 and adds 1 for his CHA bonus, for a total of 13. He can turn 1 HD (say, skeletons) and 2 HD (say, zombies) undead, but not anything more powerful than that.

    • How Many Are Turned? The Cleric determines the "turning damage" by rolling 2d6 + Cleric's Level + CHA modifier. The result is the total number of HD of undead affected in the area of effect, starting with the ones closest in proximity to the cleric.

Example: After the CHA check (see above), Jozan rolls 2d6 and gets a 7, then adds 1 for his level and 1 for his CHA bonus, for a total of 9 on his "turning damage" roll. He can affect 9 HD worth of undead. Six skeletons (1 HD) followed by 6 zombies (2 HD) and a wight (4 HD) are within range. Jozan turns all six of the skeletons and one of the zombies (with one HD of "turning damage" left over). Jozan's Charisma check (above) indicates that he had no chance of turning the wight at all, even if it had been the only undead in the area.

    • Destroying Undead: A Cleric can destroy the turned undead if his level is 2 times (or more) the level of the undead being turned. (So a level 2 cleric can destroy normal 1 HD skeletons instead of turning them.)

    • Duration: Turned undead flee you by the best and fastest means available to them. They flee for 10 rounds (1 minute). If they cannot flee, they cower (giving any attack rolls against them a +2 bonus). If you approach within 10 feet of them, however, they overcome being turned and act normally. (You can stand within 10 feet without breaking the turning effect. You just can't approach them.) You can attack them with ranged attacks (from at least 10 feet away), and others can attack them in any fashion, without breaking the turning effect.


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