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Updated on July 24, 2000


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Magic & Psionics

General  |  Arcane Magic  |  Divine Magic  | Psionics


Magic in General:

  • There will be one unified spell chapter, with divine and arcane spells interfiled.  Where there used to be two versions of a spell (the cleric's light spell and the wizard's light spell, for instance) there will be just one description.  Each spell will indicate which classes can cast it (Cleric, Wizard, Sorcerer, Bard, Druid, etc.), and what level it is for each class.  There will be a list of spells and levels available to each class.
  • The description of each spell will include the effects of magic resistance as it applies to that spell.
    • "Creatures can be both "Spell Resistant" and spellcasters (Divine or Arcane).  The Drow are one example."
  • Schools of Magic: You may know that some of the traditional schools of magic have been broken down into sub-categories. For instance, the spell Unseen Servant is listed as Conjuration (Creation). Here are some more schools and categories, an example of a spell that would fit in that category, and my speculation as to what the category encompasses:

Conjuration

  • Calling: All variations of Planar Binding [brings creatures from beyond your reality -- i.e. extra-planar]
  • Creation: Minor Creation [creates objects, either temporary or permanent]
  • Healing: Cure Light Wounds [calls forth divine energy to heal wounds]
  • Summoning: Monster Summoning I [allows you to call and control beings from your plane or otherwise nearby]

Enchantment

  • Charm: Charm person [victim is more inclined to be your friend or do as you ask]
  • Compulsion: Command [victim has little or no choice but to obey; sleep would probably be another Compulsion spell]

Illusion

  • Figment: Silent Image (or the old Phantasmal Force) [creates an illusion out of nothing; multiple people can experience]
  • Glamer: Blur [masks or alters the appearance of an existing person or object]
  • Pattern: Color Spray [produces an illusory stimulus that triggers a real reaction]
  • Phantasm: Phantasmal Killer [creates a "figment of the mind" that only the victim experiences inside his head]
  • Shadow: Shadow Conjuration (uses shadow to mimc objects, creatures, or forces including spells. 1/5 strength of actual object, etc.) [create semi-material objects out of "shadow-stuff"]
  • Spell components will remain in 3E. Cleric spells now mention a component that is abreviated "DF" for "Divine Focus." Most Cleric spells in 2E required the cleric's holy symbol or unholy symbol, or mistletoe if the caster was a Druid.
  • Spell Ranges: While there are some exceptions, most spells have a range that is either...
    • Personal [example: true strike]
    • Touch [example: shocking grasp]
    • Close (25 ft. + 5 ft / 2 levels) [example: color spray]
    • Medium (100 ft. + 10 ft. / level) [example: magic missile]
    • Long (400 ft. + 40 ft. / level) [example: locate object]
  • Anti-Magic: Playtester John Troy elaborates on what can and cannot be affected by "anti-magic" effects in the 3E rules: "The way third edition works is that just about anything that doesn't have to deal with normal physical movement on the standard material plane or the life of the creature that violates the known or extrapolated laws of physics is considered a magic power -- thus breath weapons, invisibility, displacement, energy drain, psionics, the monk's Ki powers, etc, would all be considered magical and nullified by Anti-Magic. Stuff like Poison, "Swallowing Whole", Regeneration, Natural Acids (like a pudding), Hiding in Shadows and most of the other feats and skills, etc, would not." (on the 3E Message Board) 
    • Psionics = Magic? John elaborates: "There IS an OPTIONAL rule in the DMG that says DMs can say Psionics are a different form of power and will not be affected by Anti-Magic, and they even classify the powers as seperate, so don't fret. But for the core rules, to keep things balanced and protect Psionics from being too powerful, they treat all Psionic effects as standard, and leave it up to the DM." 
  • Some very detailed info on spellcasting during combat, from Ryan Dancey, VP of TSR:  In 3rd Edition, combat is "real time", in that nobody has to make a choice about an action until the moment arrives when it is their turn to act.  This makes combat more unpredictable, but also removes bookkeeping and DM ruling headaches.  Under many circumstances, a spellcaster in 3rd Edition would probably elect not to cast a spell after having had their concentration disrupted (damaged this round, failed a save this round, suffering continuing damage from a previous attack [Melf's Acid Arrow, e.g.]).  However, since the character can attempt to overcome the distraction (in 3rd Ed parlance, the spellcaster must make a Concentration skill check [presumably on a d20], with a DC [Difficulty Class] of 10 + damage inflicted + level of spell being cast), there is a chance the character will go ahead and try to cast the spell anyway, risking failure.
    Also, there are three other things an opponent could do to disrupt a spell:
    1)  "Ready" - an action that allows a combatant to specify a trigger event on which to act after their initiative.
    2)    "Counterspell" - an action where one spellcaster attempts to thwart the spell of another by casting the same spell at the same time.
    3)    "Disrupt" - a specialized use of the spell "Dispel Magic".

    One last thing.  3rd Edition uses a concept called an "Attack of Opportunity" - basically, the right of opponents near you to attempt a melee attack when you do something that would drop your guard.  Spellcasting is one such action.  So when a spellcaster tries to cast, opponents within melee range are going to get free attacks (assuming that they are capable of doing so within certain restrictions on levels and abilities).  This could have the dual negative effects of causing the caster to take damage >and< lose the spell being cast.  Obviously, 3rd Ed spellcasters are going to be reluctant to use magic when surrounded by enemies...

  • Initiative and Concentration: Ryan Dancey answered a question I posed about wizards in combat:
    • Let's say you're a wizard, you're in combat, and you roll 10 for initiative. You make your action, then before the end of the round you're damaged by a blow. Does that damage carry over to the next round in terms of the concentration check you're going to need if you want to cast a spell as your next action? "No. Unless the damage is from a source that continues to harm you over time, like acid or fire. The way you make "damage" force a concentration check is to deliver it in response to a caster taking a spellcasting action, via the use of the "ready" action. Wizard starts casting, you shoot the wizard with a crossbow. If you hit and do damage, the Wizard must make a Concentration check to avoid muffing the spell."
  • Disrupting Spellcasting: WotC RPG VP Ryan Dancey cleared the air once and for all on the topic of spell interruption in 3E: "1) You do not have a chance of having a spell disrupted from taking damage any time in a round - only when you try to cast a spell. 2) You have a chance to have a spell disrupted, barring a failed concentration check, under two specific circumstances: a) Someone inflicts damage on the caster simultaneous with the casting via the use of the "Ready Action", or an Attack of Opportunity triggered by the attempt to cast a spell while in the Threatened area of an opponent. b) The spellcaster is taking continuing damage from a source like acid or fire."
  • Avoiding Attacks of Opportunity: An anonymous source has provided information on how spellcasters can avoid Attacks of Opportunity when they choose to cast spells while in close-quarters combat:

"You may attempt to cast a spell while 'on the defensive.' This does not provoke an attack of opportunity anymore than standing there does. You must however make a Concentration check with a DC of 15 plus the spell's level to pull it off or you lose the spell."

  • Casting touch-based spells does not provoke an attack of opportunity and doesn't need to be cast "on the defensive."
  • Counterspell: Scooper David Dunn points out that the May issue of Dragon Magazine has a tantalizing description of how counterspelling a fireball would work in 3E: Basically, when you encounter an enemy spellcaster, you declare, "I'm getting ready to counterspell anything that guy throws at us." Your character doesn't act until your target starts casting a spell. When he does, you make a successful Spellcraft check to identify the spell; if you have the same spell prepared, you can cast it as a counterspell. You're not actually casting another fireball; you're casting a fireball counterspell. If you don't mind your enemy's spell succeeding, you could just cast your own fireball back at him and not worry about having a ready action or making a Spellcraft check. As for the momentary delay in starting a counterspell after identifying the spell your opponent is casting, the 3E spell system simply isn't that precise. As long as you have the spell prepared, ready an action, and make your Spellcraft check, it works.
  • Movement and Spellcasting: Wizards may may move and still cast a spell during the combat round; apparently, Sorcerers aren't able to do so.
  • Material Components: Playtester John Troy answers the burning question, "Do cleric spells require material components other than a divine focus?" He also discusses arcane spell components.

Not for most that need any M [material] or F [focus] components--a few biggies may need more than the divine focus.

But in 3rd Edition, there's no need to really keep track of individual components. They assume you always have access to the bat guano for
fireball and have as much as you need. Arcane spellcasters purchase a "spell component pouch", which, for all intents and purposes, is the equivalent to the cleric's holy symbol (now called a divine focus). Only components that have a gold cost value are kept track of separately.

If you steal a Cleric's holy symbol or a Sorcerer's spell pouch, it pretty much has the same effect.

  • Permanency and Spell Effects: A couple of quotes from the message boards:
    • WotC's Sean Reynolds: In 3rd edition D&D, you don't use permanency to create magic items. Permanency is used to make spells permanent. There is some overlap (you can enchant an item to give you a certain spell effect _or_ you can permanency certain effects upon yourself), but there are advantages and disadvantages to each (you can lose an item, but a permanenced spell can be dispelled).
    • Playtester John Troy: If the spell used to cause aging, like Wish or Resurection, or permanently drained an attribute like Permanancy used to [in 2nd Edition], it costs XP instead.
  • The Playtesters at Work section for the November Playtest Group of the Month has been updated again.  The playtest group suggested a possible remedy to the problem of a wizard's vulnerability to Attacks of Opportunity when casting spells in close combat: "The rules now include a feat called Combat Casting, which any spellcasting character can have as early as 1st level if he or she desires to have it. A character who is capable of this feat gets a +4 bonus to any Concentration skill checks that are required while the character is casting a spell. (There's more to it than that, but the central point is that Combat Casting might not have come into existence if John's group hadn't brought it up.)"
  • WotC RPG Business Manager Keith Strohm addressed the effect of 3E on the viability of the Encyclopedia Magica and the Wizard's and Priest's Spell Compendium series:  "Both the spell compendiums and the Encyclopedia Magica already span 2 editions of the game. The way spells work has not changed significantly -- that is, it's still the same basic system, and the spell descriptions will have a similar format. In general, I think that spells will be one of the easiest facets of 2nd edition to convert to the new edition. So, overall, the Spell Compendiums will still be useful (with the possibility of a little bit of conversion, like most 2nd edition rules 'heavy" books).  Some spells may have changed their level assignment (that is, a 3rd level spell under 2nd edition may have changed to a 2nd or 4th level spell under 2nd Edition, as the entire system is more balanced), but there has already been talk of a fan-generated conversion clearinghouse for 2nd edition product, which should do the job until the 3rd edition update for these books is issued."
  • DCs for Spell Saving Throws: Setting the Difficulty Class for a spell saving throw is one of the big mysteries of the 3E rules -- or it was, until now:

The DC [for a spell] is 10 + the level of the spell + the [Int or Wis or Cha] modifier of the caster. That's it. So a wizard with an Intelligence of 14 (+2) casting a fireball (+3) will create a fireball that needs to be saved vs. Reflex against a DC of 15.

Intelligence would modify DCs for Wizard spells, Wisdom would modify DCs for Cleric and Druid spells, and Charisma would do the same for Bard and Sorcerer spells. Of course, each spell will indicate whether the save is a Will, Reflex or Fortitude save. In addition, "Casters can adjust the saving throw number, too, using a feat."

  • Metamagic Feats: The March Playtest Group of the Month helped clarify rules for Metamagic feats. In short, the spellcaster only has to acquire each Metamagic feat once to be able to use them on any spell he knows; and he can stack multiple metamagic feats together to buff up a single spell.
  • Heighten Spell: You may know that the metamagic feat Heighten Spell allows you to cast a spell as if it were a higher level by giving up a higher level slot. But why would you do it, and what are the limitations? WotC's Sean Reynolds explains: The Heighten Spell feat basically increases the DC [of the spell] and allows you to bypass level-dependant barriers such as minor globe of invulnerability. It doesn't affect damage caps.
  • Metamagic Feats (John Troy):
    • The feats are tied into the memorization process (if your class doesn't cast them "on the fly"). All the MM feats have an effect on the spell that practically limits their use. [It's been previously confirmed that a spellcaster only has to acquire each metamagic feat once to be able to use them on any spell he knows and can stack multiple metamagic feats together to buff up a single spell. As we've seen in Dragon Magazine, use of metamagic feats involves preparing the augmented spell as if it were a level or two higher than normal. So if you wanted to cast Knock (2nd level spell) as a Silent Spell, you might have to use a 3rd-level or 4th-level slot to prepare it.]
    • Since Sorcerers and Bards can choose their spells at the time of casting, if they had the appropriate Metamagic feat then they could use it on the "spur of the moment". That's the advantage they have--the disadvantage is that they'll never have as many feats as the Wizard can, or as many spells in their spell lists.
  • Free Wizard Feats: WotC's Sean Reynolds talks about the list of feats wizards draw from when selecting their bonus feats:
  • [Wizards'] free feats come from a list of 8 metamagic feats and 8 item creation feats (one of which they actually already have), and they don't get anywhere near that many free feats (in fact, there's no way even a human wizard can get them all by level 20). Sean adds that even though Wizards get bonus feats in the same manner as Fighters, they don't gain them at the same rate. Says Sean, "The fighter gets a bonus feat every other level, but there are _37_ feats the fighter can choose from using these bonus feats (and that's not counting ones that you have to choose on a per-weapon basis, like weapon focus). By comparison, there are only 16 feats that a wizard can use her bonus feats on (and she already starts with one of them, Scribe Scroll), so she can't have as many bonus feats as a fighter does. D&D is about hard choices, and it's not really a hard choice if you could get _all_ of them by 20th level, is it? :)"
  • Here's the official format for 3E spells.  The left column is the 3E format, and for comparison the right column holds the same spell in 2E format.

3rd Edition Spell Format

Flame Strike
Evocation [Fire]
Level: Clr 5, Drd 4, Sun 5, War 5
Components: V, S, DF
Casting Time: 1 action
Range: Medium (100 ft.+10 ft./level)
Area: Cylinder (10-ft. radius, 40 ft. high)
Duration: Instantaneous
Saving Throw: Reflex half
Spell Resistance: Yes

A flame strike is a vertical column of divine fire roaring downward. The spell deals 1d6 points of damage per level, to a maximum of 15d6. Half the damage is fire damage, but the rest of the damage results directly from divine power and is therefore not subject to protection from elements (fire), fire shield (chill shield), etc.

2nd Edition Spell Format

Flame Strike (Evocation)
Sphere: Combat 
Range: 60 yds. 
Components: V, S, M
Duration: Instantaneous 
Casting Time: 8
Area of Effect: 5 ft. radius x 30 ft. column 
Saving Throw: ½

When the priest evokes a flame strike spell, a vertical column of fire roars downward in the location called for by the caster. Any creatures within the area of effect must roll a saving throw vs. spell. Failure means the creature sustains 6d8 points of damage; otherwise, the damage is halved.  The material component of this spell is a pinch of sulphur.

[The spell's level and class availability would have been indicated by being included in the 5th level Priest spell section of the PHB.] 

What can we pick up from this description?  Let's examine it bit by bit, shall we?

  • Name:  pretty self-explanatory
  • School of Magic:  As in 2E, cleric spells have a School designation even though the designation isn't really used the same way it is for Arcane magic.  Here we have an indication that there are perhaps "sub-schools" -- in this case, Fire.  This info will help the DM determine that this is a fire spell, and as such could be less effective against creatures that have resistance to the whole Fire category.
  • Level:  This indicates that this spell is on the general Cleric list as a 5th level spell, the Druid spell list as a 4th level spell, in the Sun domain as a 5th level spell, and in the War domain as a 5th level spell.  A cleric who had access to either the Sun or War domain would then be able to pick this spell as a "bonus spell" from their domain list, as this would be the only 5th level spell for each domain.
  • Components:  V & S are familiar, but DF?  Probably means something like "Divine Focus" -- i.e. holy symbol as a required "material component."
  • Casting Time:  measured in number of "actions."  Interesting ... are there spells that take 2 actions to cast?
  • Range: Numbers are listed as expected, but the word "Medium" ... what's that about?  One possibility:  a "meta-magic" Feat that can increase range?  Having them sorted into categories would help if a spellcaster was going to use a Feat to bump the range of a spell from Medium to Long, for example.
  • Area:  Nice, neat definition.  As we've heard that magic is better codified in 3E, there are probably certain standard "shapes" that area-effect spells can be expected to take.
  • Duration:  Nothing surprising here.
  • Saving Throw:  The victim can attempt a Reflex saving throw, taking only half damage if successful.
  • Spell Resistance:  Again, as part of the improved codification of the magic system, we have an entry that indicates straight out if this spell is subject to Magic Resistance.
  • Spell Description:  The damage for this spell increases by caster level, a change for this particular spell.  Also note the maximum damage -- we've been told in the past that spells would reach different "maximum damage" caps depending on spell level, and 15 dice of damage was what was mentioned for 4th and 5th level spells.  Finally, we're told exactly what causes this spell's damaging forces -- this will help DMs adjudicate the effectiveness of various types of defensive measures.
  • Magic Items: There is a "system for creating magic items no matter what class you are," which will be covered in the DMG.
    • Ed Stark says, "Fighters cannot by themselves create magic weapons in 3E unless they have some component of cleric or wizard in them first (a level or two in wizard or cleric)."
  • Permanency: Playtester Der Verdammte notes that there is still a Permanency spell in the 3E rules, but it doesn't drain Constitution from the caster, and isn't used to create permanent magic items.
  • Scribe Scroll is a feat that spellcasting classes have access to, including the Cleric and the Druid.
  • Minimun Level for Some Item Creations Feats:
    • Scribe Scroll -- 1st (Wizard gain for free at first level)
    • Brew Potion -- 3rd
    • Craft Wondrous Item -- 3rd
    • Enchant Weapon and Armor -- 5th
    • Craft Wand -- 5th
    • Craft Rod -- 9th
    • Craft Staff -- 12th
  • Magic Item Creation Feats: Playtester John Troy addressed concerns that wizards would have to spend all of their feats acquiring those useful in creating magic items:

The Wizard gains bonus feats slots that are applicable to compensate, just like the fighter does [for gaining combat-related feats]. (Not the Cleric, Druid, or Sorceror, but they all have their own alternate advantages).

Using Feats does help keep people different. A Wizard will still have to decide whether or not to spend feats on Metamagic (Feats that enhance magical effects) or on Item Creation. I highly doubt that a Wizard will want to have access to creating all types of magic items. It also sets up differences--one mage may be a smith-oriented one, the other an apocathary.

Also, magic items are, from my mind, somewhat easier to create in 3rd Edition then they were in the past. So if they don't limit it in some manner soon various wizards will be creating whole stockpiles of such elements.

  • Creating Magical Items: A solid rumor is flying that it costs experience points to create magical items in 3E -- the exact opposite of the case in 2nd Ed. Playtester Der Verdammte notes that it's all part of the new XP system: "Thanks to the experience system in 3e, it does make sense...for 3e.... The experience system in Third Edition is totally different from what you've seen in 2E.... In third edition, you can get experience for a wide variety of things, though it mostly boils down to this: overcoming challenges of varying difficulty. There are clear guidelines for awarding experience for anything from killing monsters to successfully using a skill in a tough situation, to just about anything else. Roleplaying awards are covered, as well as story awards.... In order to form an informed opinion on the [magic item creation] system, you need to see the whole XP system and the entire magic item creation system." Playtester John Troy confirms: "I think many people are going to be pleased with the new magic item rules. They've done a lot to enhance and explain things, and assist with game balance. This chapter is one of my favorite areas of the rules right now."
  • Magical Collaboration: WotC's Sean Reynolds indicates that there are rules that cover multiple characters collaborating on creating a single magical item.
  • Magic Item Creation: Some leakage on the topic of creating magic items here. You know, of course, that to make magic items you need the appropriate magic item creation feat, and you know, of course, that creating items costs time, money and experience points. Anonymous tosses out some rules and some examples for us to ponder:

  • XP cost to create an item is ~1/25 the actual cost.
  • Time to create a Magic Item is 1 Day per 1000 gp of actual cost.
  • Selling cost is 2x the actual cost.

For items that give 1/day effects:

Actual cost is 500gp per spell level. Multiple spell abilities are additive.

Examples: Necklace of Prayer Beads with 1 bead of Bless is 500gp, 2 beads of Bless is 1000gp, 1 bead of Cure Serious Wounds is 2000 gp, etc.

For items that give permanent spell or ability effects:

Actual cost is 1000gp per spell level

Examples: A Vest of Bull's Strength allowing +2 is 2000gp. A Vest of Cat's Grace allowing +2 is 2000gp.

For items with more than one permanent spell of ability effects:

  • Actual cost is 1000gp per spell level multiplied by the number of permanent effects.
  • Actual cost is 500gp per +1 times the number of pluses for magic weapons or armor
  • Simple weapons and shields have a cost multiple of 1.
  • Exotic weapons, martial weapons and light armor have a cost multiple of 2.
  • Keen weapons, Intelligent weapons, and medium armor have a cost multiple of 3.
  • Heavy armor has a cost multiple of 4.
  • Spells which effect ability scores always have lowest effect.

Examples:

  • A Vest of Bull's Strength allowing +4 is 8000gp (2000 + 2000) x 2
  • A Vest of Bull's Strength and Cat's Grace allowing +2/+2 is 8000gp
  • A magic dagger:
    • +1 is 500 x 1 = 500gp
    • +2 is 500 + 500 x 2 = 2000gp
    • +3 is 500 + 500 + 500 x 3 =4500gp
    • +4 is 500 + 500 + 500 + 500 x 4 = 8000gp

  • Magic Item Tidbits: WotC's Sean Reynolds indicates that you can create magic items that have metamagic effects built into them (to maximize, extend or heighten a spell effect, for instance), and that cantrips are treated as level 0.5 when calculating the cost of creating a magic item that uses a cantrip as its magical effect.
  • Elven Chain: This very light +1 armor is made of very fine chain links and glistens like silver. Speed is 30' for medium sized creatures (20' for size S) and it has only 20% spell failure, a max dex bonus of +5 and an armor check penalty of only -2. It is considered light armor. To create it: Caster level 8, prerequisites are the Enchant Arms and Armor feat, creator must be an elf. Market price:13,300
  • Intelligent Weapons: WotC's James Wyatt on smart swords (and other wise weapons): Intelligent items now have Int, Wis, and Cha scores, and their Ego rating derives from all three (as well as all the other things it's always derived from). When a character comes in conflict with the item, however, you use an existing mechanic that is not an arbitrary "personality rating," but has everything to do with your ability to resist the will of an item in conflict with you.
  • Magic Items: Here are some names of some magic weapons and armor you could find or make using the 3E D&D rules:

From playtester John Troy:

How about Brilliant Energy Shiruken?
A
Holy Disruption Urgosh?
A Fey Bane Ghost Touch Bastard Sword?
A
Lawful Returning Hammer?
A
Vorpal Wounding Mighty Cleaving Longsword?

Just give my dwarf a
Ghost-Touch Thundering Returning War Hammer +2 and Plate Armor of Spell Resistance and Invulnerability and I'm all set to Rock and Roll!

All those weapons that I've described are REAL and in the game. Expect the higher level characters to have those weapons.

...weapons with more than one "special effect", if they have any, are rare. I was just sort of teasing you about that. The Magic Items are a lot like Diablo, in that standard items are given one or more special effects, which can stack--the more powerful items have more chances of stacked elements.

...there are now lots of ways to also add "curses" to normal items--not just the kind that turn you into a CE berserker or kill you, but there are many possible minor effects, like only working in sunlight, at night, being randomly unreliable, causes negative effects to XP or attributes, petty things like causing a characters hair to grow or requiring consumption of things. Think of the old 1st Edition artifact drawback tables for examples. So, as a DM, you could set up a campaign where all powerful magic items have such drawbacks..

...there are still several "fixed" items, like your Sun Blade, Frost Brand, or the wonderful Holy Avenger. They kept specific special types, but they also want the mixing and matching you get in a game like Diablo. Weapons and Armor both have these traits.

From WotC's Ryan Dancey:

Flaming Dire Flail (3rd Edition DMG - DRAFT)
Cost: 2690, Damage: 1d8/1d8 (double weapon), + 1d6 (both attacks; Fire; not multiplied in crit), Critical: x2, Range Increment: -, Weight: 20, Type: Bludgeoning.


The "Threat Range" for the Dire Flail is 20. In the PHB, when the Threat Range is bigger than 20, it is usually listed with the notation "19-20/2x" which means "Threat on a 19 or 20, crit x2 damage".

The "increment" value relates to the various distances ranged weapons are effective. A Light Crossbow (simple weapon), has a Range Increment of 80 ft. Weapons suffer a -2 penalty for each range increment above the first. Projectile weapons like bows can shoot up to 10 increments; thrown weapons can shoot up to 5 increments.

From John Troy:

Basically, only Attack rolls do critical, since the fire is more of a special effect. The Fire effect basically means the flame is ablaze (at the request of the wielder, who is never damaged by it).

Also, there is a different effect called "Fire Critical", which means that the sword looks normal, but if you score a critical, the blade will suddenly "blaze up" and do something like 3D6 damage. So, think of the effects as something that doesn't do critical damage, but is an "add on" to the normal damage, akin to a spell.

You could even get a Dire Flail with both Fire and Fire Critical, which pretty much should be renamed to "If you score a critical, the guy is crispied up."

From Ryan Dancey:
A Vorpal Wounding Mighty Cleaving Longsword?

Just for comparison, the above weapon would have a gp cost of 54,315. Scaled to the economy of the baseline 3e game, this one weapon would constitute essentially the entire wealth (cash, non-liquid assets, lands, equipment, magic items) of one 11th level character.

  • More on Magic Weapons: A couple of days ago, WotC's Ryan Dancey and playtester John Troy dropped some hints about the system for creating magical weapons -- a sort of mix-and-match system whereby you could have a Flaming Dire Flail or a Vorpal Wounding Mighty Cleaving Longsword. John Troy adds a few more details about the system (on the 3E Message Board; thanks to Thrombin, James Hoover, Jeff Hartsell, Henry Link and Chris Kennedy for the various scoops in various incarnations):

Vorpal does the decapitation on a Critical Hit, so it depends on the weapon's threat range.

Wounding now does 1 hp per "wound" per round unless they are bandaged, or if a cure wounds is applied (which heals all of them).

Cleaving is a feat that allows a user to make an extra attack on someone near to the strike if the prior attack killed somebody (which, of course, would include the lopping off of heads [from the Vorpal effect]). Cleaving can [normally] only be done once/round, but [the] Mighty Cleaving [power of this sword] allows an additional attempt to be taken. IF you have the Cleave feat, a sword of Mighty Cleaving allows you to use the Feat an extra time in a combat round. If you DON'T have the feat, you can't cleave at all. So there is no benefit unless the user has the ability to Cleave and chooses to do so.

...there are limits to what a weapon can have for bonuses and effects. Each effect has a virtual "cost", and thus there is a limit to what you could have. The "Vorpal" "Wounding" "Mighty Cleaving" "+1" longsword can exist, but a "Vorpal" "Dancing" "Holy" "+5" Sword is not allowed in the game (with the possible exception of a real artifact or an avatar's weapon). So there are limits to what a weapon can do.

Even taking into account the metal the weapon is made of and the special abilities of the rare intellegent weapons (which is similar to the old system in terms of determining powers), you have some limitations.

  • Minor Artifacts: Playtester John Troy discusses the fate of some formerly "standard" magic items: Several magic items, including the Sphere of Annihilation, the Deck of Many Things, the Hammer of Thunderbolts, and the Staff of the Magi are now considered "minor artifacts". Basically, they are normal [magic] items, but unlike any others no formulae for creating them are given, and it means that players will not be able to create such items at all.
    • Why can't a PC create a staff of the magi in 3E? Because the staff is a very powerful item. It grants spell resistance, acts as a rod of absorbtion for purposes of recharging, grants a retributive strike, and in addition to having a boatload of powers it also has several powers that are activated at will of no cost in charges, unlike any other staff including the staff of power. It doesn't follow the rules for the other staves. It is a very powerful item. They have only limited about a dozen or so items--they either seem to be going by (a) the sheer power of the item and/or (b) the nature of the item. The deck of many things, for instance, is sort of a cosmic tarot, and I can't see any mortal mage being able to create such a thing, with multiple blessing and curses and stuff that can't be negated by even a wish. A relatively minor item, the Philosopher's Stone, has also been categorized as such, which I think fits rule "b".
  • Magic Items: Playtester John Troy drops a few hints about magic items in 3E (on the 3E Message Board):

Think of Armor and Shields as being just like weapons, with the hints we all described earlier, except instead of mostly offensive effects you get mostly defensive ones. There are actually some pretty cool things for armor.

Everything else is governed by it's own rules. There is no "Diablo system" for the other items, they are more or less the same as they were in second edition. However, rules for potions and rod/staff/wands (mostly affecting the wands) have changed. Scrolls, rings, and misc items are pretty much as we remember them.

  • Magic Item Limitations: Playtester John Troy:
    • 3rd Ed limits the amount of misc magic items that can be effective--only one piece of jewelry, whether amulet, talisman, brooch, scarab, phylatery, etc, can be on a person.
    • Any Magic Item like a Tome that can raise an ability score permanently will require a Wish to create ... it'll be more expensive to do the tome than just to cast the wish.
  • Magic Weapons: WotC's Sean Reynolds speaks up, contradicting a fairly old "fact" that magic weapons could exceed the old +5 limit. Once again we see that rumors are only rumors: Weapon plusses don't go past +5. The system for magic magic weapons with special powers (vorpal, defender, etc.) works by adding effective "plusses" to the actual plusses (which can bring the total of actual and effective plusses beyond 5), the total of which is looked up on a chart to find the cost of making the item. So adding "vorpal" might be +2 and defender might be +3, so making a +2 vorpal defender is the cost of the "+7" entry on the chart.
  • Keen Weapons: "Keen" magic weapons double the critical threat range. I.E.: A longsword potentially crits on a 19-20. A keen longsword potentially crits on a 17-20. Characters who have the feat "Improved Critical" triple the threat range with a keen weapon. Following the aforementioned example, the threat range would be 15-20.



Arcane Magic (including Wizards, Bards & Sorcerers):
  • Wizards with high Intelligence scores, and Sorcerers and Bards with high Charisma scores, will be able to cast more spells, as priests currently can.

Bonus Spells for High Ability Scores
(confirmed numbers are in gold)

Ability
Score

0th

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

5th

1-9

Can't cast spells tied to this ability

10-11

No bonus spells

12-13

-

1

       

14-15

-

1

1

     

16-17

-

1

1

1

   

18-19

-

1

 1

1 

 1

 

20-21

-

2

1

1 

 1

  • Gaining Arcane Spells: Anonymous dropped by with a little tidbit on the topic of gaining new arcane spells: "Wizards gain 2 spells per level to put in their spell book. These spells must be of levels the wizard can cast."
  • According to Sean Reynolds, there are still specialist wizards in 3E even though there is only one "wizard class": "Just as a ranger can choose a favored enemy, or a cleric can choose domains from a god, a wizard can choose a specialized school and forbidden schools."
  • Preparing Spells:

The latest Inquest Gamer magazine (#62, June 2000) has a 4 page article on 3e, it appears the IQ staff have been playtesting for the last couple of months. Under "Spells", it describes some changes to the memorization process:

"Though you still need a full night's rest to clear your mind for memorizing spells, you don't have to commit them to memory all at once. You can leave a few spots open and take 10-15 minutes later in the day to fill them in as needed."

"By the book, it used to take a 20th-level wizard 27 hours to memorize all his spells; now, you can do it in an hour."

  • Wizards and other Arcane spellcasters receive slots for cantrip-type spells as well as their normal spells. 

Cantrip List

Sorcerer or Mage Cantrips

Arcane Mark (inscribes a personal rune (visible or invisible))
Dancing Lights (figment torches or other lights)
Daze (creature loses next action)
Detect Magic (detects spells or magic items within 60')
Detect Poison (on one creature or object)
Disrupt Undead (d6 damage to undead)
Flare
(one creature -1 to attack due to dazzling)
Ghost Sounds (figment sounds)
Light (object shines like a torch)
Mage Hand (5lb telekinesis)
Mending (makes minor repair on an object)
Open/Close (opens or closes small light things)
Prestidigitation ( performs minor tricks)
Ray of Frost (d3 cold damage)
Read Magic (read scrolls and spell books)
Resistance (subject gets +1 to saves)
Bard Cantrips 

Dancing Lights (figment torches or other lights)
Daze
(creature loses next action)
Detect Magic (detects spells or magic items within 60')
Flare (one creature -1 to attack due to dazzling)
Ghost Sounds (figment sounds)
Light
(object shines like a torch)
Mage Hand (5lb telekinesis)
Mending (makes minor repair on an object)
Open/Close (opens or closes small light things)
Prestidigitation ( performs minor tricks)
Read Magic (read scrolls and spell books)
Resistance
(subject gets +1 to saves)

  • In their first Playtesters At Work entry, the November Playtest Group of the Month helped beef up the benefits of a wizard having a familiar:
    • Familiars got a major revamping in the updated version of the rules. A wizard of levels 1-2 can summon a familiar that has an Intelligence of 6. While his or her familiar is within arm's reach, the wizard gains the benefit of the feat Alertness (in place of the saving throw bonus). Most types of familiars bestow a particular benefit on the wizard, depending on their nature; for instance, having a cat familiar gives a wizard a +2 bonus on all Move Silently skill checks.  The revised rules go into much more detail than the earlier rules did about what familiars are capable of and how they benefit their masters.
  • About Wild Mages, Elementalist, etc:  "Most of the "weird" specializations (the elemental mages from Tome of Magic or Al-Qadim, the specialists from Spells and Magic, etc) aren't really discussed in the core rules set. We hope to address this in future product. In the meantime, most spells do more or less what they did in 2E, but they've been balanced against spells of similar level."  Some spells have changed level, but "[m]any of the classic D&D spells made it onto our "sacred cows" list, because D&D wouldn't be D&D if you couldn't fireball people at 5th level.)"
  • Bards have their own spell list with "cool bard-only spells". As for prestige classes, bards would have an easy time becoming "shadow dancers" or assassins.
  • Bard Magic:  The December Playtest Group of the Month's Playtester's at Work section has been updated.  This week, we learn that the Bard now casts spells "just as Sorcerers do, not needing to memorize them beforehand or keep a spellbook."  For both the Sorcerer and the Bard, high Charisma will impact the number of spells these spellcasters can cast per day.
  • Bards get "social, entertaining, and practical" spells, not spells like (specific example) Magic Missile.
  • Wizards can "master" a spell, letting them cast it without memorizing it; however, once a spell is mastered, it can't be "un-mastered".
  • Free Magick: "Wizards can leave some of their spell potential untapped so they can prepare a spell on the fly if they need to; that's pretty handy when you suddenly discover the need for an obscure spell."
  • Schools of Spells: "The exact spells in each school has changed a little bit. There are no longer spells that belong to more than one school. There's also a Universal school that contains a few spells that all wizards need."
  • Counterspell: "If you decide to attempt a counterspell, you can watch a foe and try to determine what spell he or she is casting (using your spellcraft skill). If you successfully identify the spell and you happen to have that spell prepared, you can use the prepared spell to counter – completely negate – the opponent's spell."
  • The Wizards of 3E in Dragon: The February 2000 issue of Dragon contains the promised article about the 3E Wizard class. Here are the highlights:
    • Favored Schools of Magic: Wizards who choose to "favor" one school may select which of the other schools to sacrifice. The schools are weighted so that taking one of the more "useful" schools such as Transmutation would require the wizard to give up an equally useful school (such as Evocation), or a handfull of less useful schools.
    • Counterspells: In combat, if you see an enemy spellcaster start casting a spell you have memorized (you'd know this by means of a Spellcraft check), you can cast the identical spell with a chance to neutralize the enemy's spell.
    • Metamagic Feats: As we've heard, some of the Feats available to spellcasters include "metamagic" -- the ability to affect spells. Some of the metamagic feats mentioned include Quicken Spell (cast a spell and perform another action in the same round, even casting a second spell), Still Spell (no somatic component), Silent Spell (no verbal component), and Maximum Spell (achieve maximum results). The article implies that there will be limits on how often these feats can be used once they've been taken.
    • Spell Standardization: The 3E team addressed many issues related to spell design, from clearly indicating what spells can be dismissed by the spellcaster at will, what exactly a "summoning" spell is, and when certain kinds of bonuses can be stacked (the example given is a ring of protection and a protection from evil spell: they provide the same kind of protection -- a "deflection effect" --, so the bonuses don't stack; a ring of protection and a suit of magical armor, however, provide different kinds of protection, so the bonuses do stack).
    • Spell Criticals: Spells that are delivered by touch or by means of a "ray" require an attack roll; the drawback of course is that there's a chance the wizard could miss, but the benefit is that critical hits can be achieved by these kinds of spells.
    • Other Tidbits: Mentioned but not elaborated upon are...
      • "Clear rules for creating magical items"
      • "Your wizard can use a sword"
      • "Create scrolls at 1st level"
    • Familiars: I saved this for last because there's a table. :) 3E wizard familiars can improve its AC, spell resistance, and Intelligence as the wizard increases in level, and they gain the ability to control other animals of their species. A familiar has the same HD as its master has levels, and has half its master's hit points. Familiars use their master's base attack bonuses, adding their own STR or DEX modifiers (whichever is better). Familiars use their master's saving throws or their own (again, whichever is better).

3E Familiars
(view screenshot of Familair Screen in Character Generator)

Familiar Special Abilities
Bat None
Cat Wizard gains +2 to Move Silently checks
Hawk None
Owl Wizard gains +2 to Move Silently checks; Familiar has night vision
Rat Wizard gains +2 on Fortitude saving throws
Raven Familiar speaks one language
Tiny Snake Familiar has poisonous bite
Toad Wizard gains +2 Constitution
Weasel Wizard gains +2 on Reflex saving throws

1st-Level Wizard and Sorcerer Spells from Winter Fantasy 3E Demo

Abjuration

  • Alarm.  Wards an area for 2 hours/level.
  • Hold Portal.  Holds door shut.
  • Protection from Chaos/Evil/Good/Law. +2 AC and saves, counter mind control, hedge out elementals and outsiders.
  • Shield.  Invisible disc gives cover and blocks magic missiles.

Divination

  • Comprehend Languages.  Understands all spoken or written languages.
  • Detect Secret Passages.  Reveals hidden doors within 60 ft.
  • Detect Undead.  Reveals undead within 60 ft.
  • Identify.  Determines single feature of a magic item.
  • True Strike.  Adds +20 bonus to your next attack roll.

Conjuration

  • Grease.  Makes 10' sq or 1 object slippery.
  • Mage Armor.  Gives subject +4 armor bonus.
  • Mount.  Summons riding horse for 2 hrs/level.
  • Obscuring Mist.  Fog surrounds you.
  • Summon Monster I.  Calls outsider to fight for you.
  • Unseen Servant. Creates invisible force that obeys your commands.

Enchantment

  • Charm Person.  Makes one person your friend.
  • Hypnotism.  Fascinates 2d4 HD of creatures.
  • Sleep. Put 2d4 HD of creatures into comatose slumber.

Evocation

  • Magic Missile.  1d4+1 damage; +1 missile/2 levels above 1st (max 5).
  • Tenser's Floating Disc.  3 ft. diameter horizontal disc that holds 100 lb/level.

Illusion

  • Change Self.  Changes your appearance.
  • Color Spray.  Knocks unconscious, blinds or stuns 1d6 weak creatures.
  • Nystul's Magical Aura.  Grants object false magic aura.
  • Nystul's Undetectable Aura.  Masks magic item's aura.
  • Silent Image.  Creates minor illusion of your design.
  • Ventriloquism.  Throws voice for 1 min/level.

Necromancy

  • Cause Fear.  One subject flees for 1d4 rounds.
  • Chill Touch.  1 touch/level inflicts 1d6 damage and 1 str damage.
  • Ray of Enfeeblement.  Ray reduces strength by 1d6 points +1 pt / 2 levels

Transmutation

  • Animate Rope.  Makes a rope move at your command.
  • Burning Hands.  1d4 fire damage/level (max 5d4).
  • Enlarge.  Object or creature grows by 10%/level (max 50%).
  • Erase. Mundane or magical writing vanishes.
  • Expeditious Retreat.  Doubles your speed.
  • Feather Fall. object or creatures fall slowly.
  • Jump.  Subject gets +30 on Jump checks.
  • Magic Weapon.  Weapon gains +1 bonus.
  • Message.  Whispered conversations at a distance.
  • Reduce.  Object or creature shrinks 10%/level (max 50%).
  • Shocking Grasp.  Touch delivers electric charge (1d8+1/level).
  • Spider Climb.  Grants ability to walk on walls and ceilings.

Unseen Servant

Conjuration (Creation)
Level: Brd 1, Sor/Wiz 1
Components: V, S, M
Casting Time: One action
Range: Close (25 ft.+5 ft./2 levels)
Effect: One invisible, mindless, shapeless servant
Duration: 1 hour/level
Saving Throw: None
Spell Resistance: No

The unseen servant is an invisible, mindless, shapeless force that performs simple tasks at your command. It can run and fetch things, open unstuck doors, and hold chairs, as well as clean and mend. The servant can perform only one activity at a time, but it repeats the same action over and over again if told to do so (thus allowing a caster to command the servant to clean the floor and then turn his attention elsewhere as long as he remains within range). It can open only normal doors, drawers, lids, etc. It has an effective Strength of 2 (so it can lift 20 pounds or drag 100 pounds). It can trigger traps and such, but it can only exert 20 pounds of force, and that is not enough to activate certain pressure plates, etc. Its Speed is 15.

The servant cannot fight; even a 20-pound item must be dropped from at least 40 feet to deal 1d6 points of damage to whatever it hits, and it’s hard to get the unseen servant 40 feet above an opponent. It cannot be killed, but it dissipates if it takes 6 points of damage from area-effect attacks. (It gets no saving throws vs. attacks.) If you attempt to send it beyond the spell’s range (measured from your current position), the servant immediately ceases to exist.

Material components: a piece of string and a bit of wood.

Notes:

  • The Creation note in parentheses implies that there are multiple varieties of Conjuration (Creation, Summoning).
  • It's a first-level spell for Bards, Sorcerers and Wizards. I wonder why it's listed as Sor/Wiz 1 rather than Sor 1, Wiz 1?
  • Range has improved over the 2E version of this spell -- a high-level caster could get the unseen servant to move quite a distance from him.
  • Duration has also improved significantly over the 2E version.
  • Interesting hint about the relationship between one's Str score and how much it can lift or drag.
  • Details here suggest that this spell has been examined over the past ten years in forums such as Sage Advice -- players have likely asked questions such as "How fast can it move?" and "Can I use the servant to drop objects on enemies?"

True Strike

Divination
Level: Sor/Wiz 1
Components: V, S, F
Casting Time: One action
Range: Personal
Target: You

Duration: 1 round
Saving Throw: None
Spell Resistance: No

You gain temporary, intuitive insight into the immediate future during his next attack. Your next single attack roll (within the duration of the spell) gains a +20 bonus; additionally, you are not affected by the miss chance that applies to attacks against a concealed target.

Focus: a small wooden replica of an archery target.

Notes:

  • Looks like there is now a distinction between components that are consumed during casting (M for material component, as in the Unseen Servant spell in February) and those that are not (F for focus). We've seen DF for Divine Focus in cleric spells; this refers to the cleric's holy symbol which isn't consumed in spellcasting either.
  • As Ed Stark says when introducing this spell, its benefits are an almost guaranteed hit (very useful for spells that require an attack roll or one-shot magic items like arrows of slaying) and an improved chance to hit invisible or otherwise concealed creatures.
  • That 1 round duration threw me for a second. It seems to imply that "1 round" includes your next action or possibly "all of next round." The spell would be pretty worthless if it expired before you got to make an attack or cast a spell! As Ed mentions, if you have the Quicken Spell feat, you could choose to cast this spell and another spell in the same round.
  • We see the continued trend of the PHB addressing the player directly ("Target: You").

Wizard Spells Per Level (speculation by Bob Fitch; confirmed numbers are in Gold)

Chart is based on anonymous tips plus analysis of sample wizard character spell lists (which are possibly incomplete or incorrect in terms of numbers of spells). Note that Sorcerers gain spells at a different rate, both in number of spells per day and when higher-level spells are gained.

Caster
Level

Arcane Spell Level

Cantrip

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

5th

6th

7th

8th

9th

1

3

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

3

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

3

2

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

3

3

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

4

3

2

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

4

3

3

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

4

4

3

2

1

 

 

 

 

 

8

4

4

3

3

2

 

 

 

 

 

9

4

4

4

3

2

1

 

 

 

 

10

4

4

4

3

3

2

 

 

 

 

11

4

4

4

4

3

2

1

 

 

 

12

4

4

4

4

3

3

2

 

 

 

13

4

4

4

4

4

3

2

1

 

 

14

4

4

4

4

4

3

3

2

 

 

15

4

4

4

4

4

4

3

2

1

 

16

4

4

4

4

4

4

3

3

2

 

17

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

3

2

1

18

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

3

3

2

19

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

3

2

20

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

3

3

  • Sorcerer Spells: Anonymous has provided a few more levels for the sorcerer spellcasting charts. I have filled in some speculation.

Sorcerer Spellcasting (Spells Per Day)

Sorcerer
Level

Arcane Spell Level

Cantrip

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

5th

6th

7th

8th

9th

1

5

3

               

2

6

4

               

3

6

5

               

4

6

6

3

             

5

6

6

4

             

6

6

6

5

3

           

7

6

6

6

4

           

8

6

6

6

5

3

         

9

6

6

6

6

4

         

10

6

6

6

6

5

3

 

 

 

 


Total Sorcerer Spells Known Per Level

Sorcerer
Level

Arcane Spell Level

Cantrip

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

5th

6th

7th

8th

9th

1

4

2

               

2

5

2

               

3

5

3

               

4

6

3

1

             

5

6

4

2

             

6

7

4

2

1

           

7

7

5

3

2

           

8

8

5

3

2

1

         

9

8

5

4

3

2

         

10

9

5

4

3

2

1

 

 

 

 

  • Magic Missile in D20 System: WotC's Ryan Dancey used the Magic Missile spell to show the dry "stat block" that would be part of the open D20 System game as a way to illustrate that D20 and 3E D&D are related but not the same:

Magic Missile

Type: Evocation [Force]; Level: Sor/Wiz 1; Components: V,S; Casting Time: One Action; Range: Medium (100ft +10ft/level); Targets: Up to 5, no two can be more than 15ft apart; Duration: Instantaneous; Saving Throw: None; Spell Resistance: Yes; Each missile 1d4+1 damage; missile strikes unerringly even in melee, partial cover or concealment; no damage to inanimate objects; if multiple missiles used, caster picks which missiles strike which targets; 1 missile per 2 levels after 1st (maximum 5 missiles).

  • Spell Details From Anonymous, With Love: Some spell-related 3E bits and pieces for your perusal, care of John Doe (and additional info from Anonymous2):
    • Detect spells are no longer automatic. They require a skill roll of some sort against a difficulty factor. An example is detect magic, which requires a Spellcraft roll against a DC.
      • Update: Anonymous2 adds: Not totally true. You can detect magic without a Spellcraft roll. The roll is to detect the school of magic for what you have dectected.
    • Stoneskin is a very different spell, you don't count how many times you are hit anymore. The material component (diamond dust) costs 250 GP per casting, The spell lasts 10 minutes/level or until it has absorbed 10HP/caster level. The effect is damage reduction, just like gargoyles and elementals have. The spell reduces damage by 10 pts per hit, unless the hit is from the appropriate magic weapon.
      • Update: Anonymous2 adds: The damage reduction is 10/+5 (meaning a +5 weapon is needed to penetrate). Also, the spell is 4th level for Wizards and Sorcerers, but is a 6th level spell in the Strength and Earth cleric domains.
    • There are only 3 spell ranges to memorize now: short, medium and long. Every spell that is a particular range has the same range increment in feet.
    • Lighting bolt now starts at the casters fingers and goes out to the full range of the spell. The 5' wide version goes out to a further range increment than the 10' wide version. The spell can cause damage to doors and objects, ignite combustibles, and melt soft metal coins.
    • Level drains afflict you with a temporary "negative level", you have 24 hours to get this removed via a restoration or similar spell. At the end of the 24 hours you make a Fortitude save to see if the level drain becomes permanent. There are 4th-level spells available that can remove the negative level.
    • Fireball no longer requires that the Dungeon Master have the ability to do cubic geometry and Pi-R-cubed calculations in his head. All areas that are open, directly connected to, and within 20' of, the blast point are affected. The spell can cause damage to doors and objects, ignite combustibles, and melt soft metal coins. The spell shoots a pellet from the casters fingertip to the chosen burst point. If the pellet impacts a surface it explodes early. Difficult or restricted shots (example given is shooting the pellet through a castles arrow slit) require an attack roll to avoid hitting the obstruction.
    • Do NOT die! There is no effect that raises you from the dead (even a full wish) which prevents you from losing a level due to dying. You drop to the midpoint of the previous level.
      • Update: Anonymous2 adds: There is a spell that allows you to come back from the dead without losing a level: true resurrection, a 9th level cleric spell.
      • Update: Playtester John Troy adds: If you only have one level and you are raised, you will lose 1 CON, since you can't lose any more levels. (thanks to PA for the scoop)
    • The spell find traps is no longer automatic. It empowers the cleric to use the trap finding skills as effectivly as a rogue can, but you still have to make a skill roll against a DC to find a trap.
    • The strength spell (called bull's strength) is complemented by similar spells that increase Dex and Con. All classes gain the same increase in ability.
    • Haste has no negative impact on the recipient. It allows an extra "partial action" in a round. A [single] melee attack is a partial action. With haste running you would get to move and take 2 attacks instead of the standard move and attack routine.
  • First Level Bard Spells: alarm, cause fear, charm person, cure light wounds, detect secret doors, erase, expeditious retreat, feather fall, grease, hypnotism, identify, mage armor, magic weapon, message, protection from chaos, prot evil, prot good, prot law, silent image, sleep, summon monster I, unseen servant, ventriloquism.


Divine Magic (including Clerics, Druids & Specialty Priests):

  • Bonus Spells: Clerics, Druids, Paladins and Rangers with high Wisdom will be able to cast more spells per day, as shown below:

Bonus Spells for High Ability Scores

Ability
Score

0th

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

5th

1-9

Can't cast spells tied to this ability

10-11

No bonus spells

12-13

-

1

       

14-15

-

1

1

     

16-17

-

1

1

1

   

18-19

-

1

 1

1 

 1

 

20-21

-

2

1

1 

 1

  • Clerical Healing in 3E:  You probably know by now that Clerics in 3E will be able to swap any memorized spell for a healing spell of commensurate value (swap a first-level spell for 1d8 healing, a second-level spell for 2d8 healing, etc.).  This begs the question, "Are the cure [whatever] spells still in the game?"  Designer Skip Williams answered this on DND-L:  "The cure light wounds spell is still in the game for two reasons: First, you need the stats when casting the spell, even when you're swapping it for another spell. Also non-clerics (such as druids and paladins) don't have the swap ability. (There was a recent Dragon article that implied druids could swap for cures, but that's incorrect.)"
  • Ryan Dancey provided the rationale behind the rules for priests "trading" memorized spells for healing powerHere's the big intention behind this rule:  The smart player (or the player browbeaten into it by the other players) who has a Cleric character should, under 1e and 2e rules, always take the maximum amount of "curing" spells possible.  The 3e system frees the cleric from this need.  Now, finally, all those other really interesting Cleric spells in the lists can be taken without concern that doing so will doom a comrade when things get sticky.  We think this simple change will have a sweeping effect on the Cleric class - creating hundreds of interesting varients from the base "healing warrior" concept - without unduly risking the safety of the party.
  • In response to comments about the "Ten Ways to Play 3E" article that appeared two issues ago, designer Jonathan Tweet had this to say about the ability of clerics to swap spells for healing"The rule of spontaneously healing others by swapping out a memorized spell ... applies only to good clerics (or neutral clerics of good deities, or neutral clerics who worship neutral deities but "lean" toward good).  Evil clerics (or neutral clerics of evil deities, or neutral clerics who worship neutral deities but "lean" toward evil) can swap out a memorized spell to deal damage."
  • Cleric Heal/Harm swapping:  When a cleric swaps a memorized spell in exchange for healing or harming ability, is this counted as a spell that can be disrupted in combat?  According to Ryan Dancey, "Yes."  Since these spells must be delivered by touch, an evil cleric would presumably suffer an attack of opportunity when using this ability in close combat.
  • Clerical Spell Swapping: WotC's Sean Reynolds: Converting a spell acts just like casting the cure spell of that level. There is absolutely no drawback to converting a spell compared to using a prepared cure spell (except that you won't be able to use the original spell being converted, of course).
  • Cleric Spell Swapping (Again): Okay, so WotC's Sean Reyolds tells us there's absolutely no penalty for swapping a prepared cleric spell for a healing spell. Well, what about time? Does swapping a spell take more time than casting a healing spell that's been prepared ahead of time? Sean says, Nope, converting it takes no time, and casting the now-a-cure-spell takes 1 action (just like a prepared cure). If you _metamagic_ the converted spell (say, if you wanted to Maximize it so it cures the max amount), then _that_ makes the casting time a full-round action.
  • Turning Undead: Clerics and Paladins can Turn Undead, as described on the Combat page. (Paladins turn at 2 levels lower than the Cleric.)
  • Cleric Spell Levels:  Cleric spells will be divided into nine levels like wizard spells in 3E.  Some spells will be moved up from seventh level into the 8th and 9th level spots, some of those upper-level spells will be a few of the Quest spells from Tome of Magic, and new priest spells will be added to those upper levels as well.
  • RichBaker, on the topic of Cleric spells:  "One of the problems with the 2E cleric was that there were entire spell levels where all of his spell selections just seemed lame. We really punched up the priest's spell list by including a good variety of offense, defense, and miscellaneous spells. There are dozens and dozens of cool new spells (or spells from sources such as Spells & Magic) for 3E."
  • Clerics will be like specialty wizards, getting a bonus spell at each spell level. They also have access to a limited list of cleric spells to balance their bonus spell, and they still have granted powers that are now tuned to the domains you select.
  • Spiritually Hammered: The official 3E site has been updated with the Spell of the Month for March: Spiritual Weapon. The spell and my analysis are below.

Spiritual Weapon

Evocation [Force]
Level: Clr 2, War 2
Components: V, S, DF
Casting Time: 1 action
Range: Medium (100 ft.+10 ft./level)
Effect: A magical weapon of force
Duration: 1 round/level (D)
Saving Throw: None
Spell Resistance: Yes

A melee weapon made of pure force springs into existence and attacks opponents at a distance, as you direct it, dealing 1d8 damage per hit. The weapon takes the shape of a weapon favored by your deity or a weapon with some spiritual significance or symbolism to you (see below) and has the same critical threat ranges and multipliers as a real weapon of its form. It strikes the opponent you designate, starting with one attack the round the spell is cast and continuing each round thereafter. It uses your base attack as its attack bonus (possibly allowing it multiple attacks per round in subsequent rounds). It strikes as a spell, not as a weapon, so, for example, it can strike incorporeal creatures. The weapon always strikes from your direction. It does not get a flanking bonus or help a combatant get one. Your feats (such as Weapon Focus) or combat actions (such as charge) do not affect the weapon. If the weapon goes beyond the spell range, if it goes out of your sight, or if you are not directing it, the weapon returns to you and hovers.

Each round after the first, you can use a standard action to switch the weapon to a new target. If you do not, the weapon continues to attack the previous round’s target. On any round that the weapon switches targets, it gets one attack. Subsequent rounds of attacking that target allow the weapon to make multiple attacks if your base attacks would allow it to. The spiritual weapon cannot be attacked or damaged.

If an attacked creature has SR, the resistance is checked the first time that the spiritual weapon strikes it. If the weapon is successfully resisted, the spell is dispelled. If not, the weapon has its normal full effect for the duration of the spell.

The weapon that you get is often a force replica of your deity’s own personal weapon, many of which have individual names. A cleric without a deity gets a weapon based on his alignment. A neutral cleric without a particular deity can create a spiritual weapon of any alignment provided he is acting at least generally in accord with that alignment at the time.

Notes

  • The 2E version of this spell was called Spiritual Hammer and created only a hammer of force rather than a weapon associated with the cleric's deity or alignment.
  • We see one of the "sub-categories" of the Evocation school (Force).
  • Like most Cleric spells, this one has a Divine Focus (DF) as a material component.
  • As compared to the 2E version, this spell loses duration overall and has a shorter range at higher caster levels.
  • What does the "D" mean next to the duration? My guess is that the spell can be dispelled by the caster at will. Thus the duration is 1 round per level or until dismissed by the caster.
  • Some 3E lingo is dropped in the spell description: "base attack," "critical threat range and multipliers," "flanking bonus," "feats," "combat actions," "standard action," "SR" [Spell Resistance].
  • The descriptions mentions weapons based on alignment -- but such a list is missing. One wonders if a chart would accompany the spell.

Death Knell

Necromancy [Death, Evil]
Level: Clr 2, Death 2
Components: V, S
Casting Time: 1 action
Range: Touch
Target: Living creature touched
Duration: Instantaneous/10 minutes per target HD (see text)
Saving Throw: Will negates
Spell Resistance: Yes

The cleric draws forth the ebbing life force of a badly wounded creature and uses it to fuel her own power. Upon casting this spell, the cleric touches a living creature that has –1 hit points or fewer. If the subject fails its saving throw, it dies, and the cleric gains 1d8 temporary hit points and +2 Strength. Additionally, the cleric’s effective caster level goes up by +1, improving spell effects dependent on caster level. (This increase in effective caster level does not grant the cleric access to more spells.) These effects last for 10 minutes per HD of the target creature.

  • Forgotten Realms Specialty Priests:  WotC VP Ryan Dancey commented on the development of the 3E version of the FR specialty priests: "The FR team is right in the middle of creating concepts for what specialty FR priests will look like in 3e.  The rules for 'specialty clerics' in the core rules are designed to be used as a foundation for any campaign to allow DMs to easily create pantheons and servants of those pantheons that are balanced and interesting.  It is also 'generic' enough that when we use a specialty cleric in an adventure, it won't stick out like a sore thumb.  The FR specialty priests are far more complex, both in scope and in balance.  The 3e FR book will handle this issue in great detail.  I believe that everyone will be quite happy with the result."
  • More Cleric Domains for FR Clerics? WotC's Sean Reynolds provides a partial list of cleric domains that are being developed for the Forgotten Realms: "Charm, Fate, Time, Undeath."
  • Spheres of spells, which could include anywhere from a scant handful to a plethora of quasi-related spells in 2nd Ed., have been replaced with domains. "A domain is nine spells, one of each level from 1st to 9th, each of which relates to the domain's overall theme -- plus a granted power."  Apparently, each cleric gains access to two domains, and can cast an extra spell per spell level from either of these two domains, rather like a specialist wizard's extra specialty spells.  This implies that there's a list of "universal" or "general" spell that all clerics can draw from as well.
  • The clerical ability to turn the undead is available to all clerics, and is an extra granted power beyond those offered by whatever domains the cleric selects.  The ability to turn the undead has a steady improvement from the lowest to the highest character levels, and does not "top out" at 14th level as it does in 2E.  The ability to turn undead is modified by the cleric's Charisma score.  Clerics will be limited to a few turning attempts per day (3 per day plus Charism bonus), but can try more than once per combat if desired.
  • Cleric spells range from 0-level "orisons" to 9th-level spells.
  • Priests will have access to orisons, or priestly cantrips, in the 3E rules.  Wizards have long had access to cantrips (minor magical effects), and now apparently priests have them as well.

Orisons

Cleric Orisons
Create Water
(2 gal / level)
Cure Minor Wounds (cures 1 pt)
Detect Magic (detects spells or magic items within 60')
Detect poison (on one creature or object)
Guidance (+1 on one roll, throw, or check)
Inflict Minor Wounds
(damage, 1 pt)
Light (object shines like a torch)
Mending (makes minor repair on an object)
Purify Food and Drink (purifies 1cu ft/level of food or water)
Read Magic (read scrolls and spell books)
Resistance (subject gets +1 to saves)
Virtue (subject temporarily gains 1 hp)
Druid Orisons
Create Water
(2 gal / level)
Cure Minor Wounds (cures 1 pt)
Detect Magic (detects spells or magic items within 60')
Detect poison (on one creature or object)
Flare (one creature -1 to attack due to dazzling)
Guidance (+1 on one roll, throw, or check)
Know Direction
(you discern North)
Light
(object shines like a torch)
Mending (makes minor repair on an object)
Purify Food and Drink (purifies 1cu ft/level of food or water)
Read Magic (read scrolls and spell books)
Resistance (subject gets +1 to saves)
Virtue (subject temporarily gains 1 hp)


First Level Cleric Spells from Winter Fantasy

  • Bane - Enemies suffer -1 attack -1 vs fear 
  • Bless - Allies gain +1 attack and +1 vs fear 
  • Bless Water - Makes holy water 
  • Cause Fear - One subject flees for 1d4 rounds 
  • Command - One subject obeys one-word command for one round 
  • Comprehend Languages - Understand all spoken and written language 
  • Cure Light Wounds - Cures 1d8 +1/level damage (max +5) 
  • Curse Water - Makes unholy water 
  • Deathwatch - See how wounded subjects within 30 ft are 
  • Detect Chaos/Evil/Good/Law - Reveals creatures, spells or objects 
  • Detect Undead - Reveals undead within 60' 
  • Divine Favor - You gain attack and damage bonus +1/3 levels 
  • Doom - One subject suffers -2 on attacks, damage, saves and checks 
  • Endure Elements - Ignores 5 hp damage/round from one element type 
  • Entropic Shield - Ranged attacks against you suffer 20% miss chance 
  • Inflict Light Wounds - Touch, 1d8 +1 per level (max. +5) 
  • Invisibility to Undead - Undead can't perceive one subject per level 
  • Magical Stone - 3 stones gain +1 attack, inflict d6+1 damage 
  • Magic Weapon - Weapon gains +1 bonus 
  • Obscuring Mist - Fog surrounds you 
  • Protection from Chaos/Evil/Good/Law - +2 AC and saves, counter mind control, hedge out elementals and outsiders 
  • Random Action - One creature acts randomly for one round 
  • Remove Fear - +4 vs fear for one subject, +1/4 levels 
  • Sanctuary - Opponents can't attack you and you can't attack 
  • Shield of Faith - Aura grants +2 or better deflection bonus 
  • Summon Monster I - Summons ousider to fight for you 

Notes from Eric:

  • Note the cap to Cure and Inflict Light Wounds. This likely goes up as the cure wounds spells increase in level (cure moderate, cure serious, etc.). Also, if a spell is swapped for healing, likely a similar cap will be imposed. 
  • "Outsiders" seems to be a new piece of D&D lingo -- meaning either "summoned creatures" in general, or "extra-planar creatures" in particular. 

First Level Druid Spells

  • Animal Friendship - Ggain a permanent animal companion
  • Calm Animals - Calm 2d4 +1/lv HD of animals, beasts and magical beasts 
  • Cure Light Wounds - Cures 1d8 +1/level damage (max +5) 
  • Detect Animals or Plants - Discern species of animal or plant
  • Detect Snares and Pits - Reveals natural or primitive traps 
  • Endure Elements - Ignore 5 hp/round of one energy type
  • Entangle - Plants entangle everyone in a 40'-radius circle
  • Faerie Fire - Outlines subject with light, cancelling blur, concealment, etc.
  • Goodberry - Creates 2d4 berries, each cures 1 hp (max 8 hp per day)
  • Invisibility to Animals - One animal per caster level can't perceive the caster
  • Magic Fang - One natural weapon of subject creature gains +1 attack and damage
  • Obscuring Mist - Fog surrounds you 
  • Pass without Trace - One subject per level leaves no tracks
  • Shillelagh - Cudgel or staff becomes +1 weapon (d10 damage) for 1 min/lvl
  • Summon Nature's Ally I - Summons animal or elemental to fight for you 

First Level Paladin and RangerSpells

Paladin Spells

  • Bless
  • Detect Water
  • Bless Weapon
  • Create Water
  • Cure Light Wounds
  • Detect Poison
  • Detect Undead
  • Divine Favor
  • Endure Elements
  • Magic Weapon
  • Protection from Evil
  • Read Magic
  • Resistance
  • Virtue

Ranger Spells

  • Alarm
  • Animal Friendship
  • Delay Poison
  • Detect Animals or Plants
  • Detect Snares and Pits
  • Entangle
  • Magic Fang
  • Pass without Trace
  • Read Magic
  • Resist Elements
  • Speak with Animals
  • Summon Nature's Ally I

Cleric Spells Per Level
(confirmed numbers are in
gold; +1 means clerics gain a domain spell at each spell level)

Caster
Level

Divine Spell Level

Orison

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

5th

6th

7th

8th

9th

1

3

1+1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

4

2+1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

4

2+1

1+1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

5

3+1

2+1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

5

3+1

2+1

1+1

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

5

3+1

3+1

2+1

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

6

4+1

3+1

2+1

1+1

 

 

 

 

 

8

6

4+1

3+1

3+1

2+1

 

 

 

 

 

9

6

4+1

4+1

3+1

2+1

1+1

 

 

 

 

10

6

4+1

4+1

3+1

3+1

2+1

 

 

 

 

11

6

5+1

4+1

4+1

3+1

2+1

1+1

     

12

6

5+1

4+1

4+1

3+1

3+1

2+1

     

13

6

5+1

5+1

4+1

4+1

3+1

2+1

1+1

   

14

6

5+1

5+1

4+1

4+1

3+1

3+1

2+1

   

15

6

5+1

5+1

5+1

4+1

4+1

3+1

2+1

1+1

 

16

6

5+1

5+1

5+1

4+1

4+1

3+1

3+1

2+1

 

17

6

5+1

5+1

5+1

5+1

4+1

4+1

3+1

2+1

1+1

18

6

5+1

5+1

5+1

5+1

4+1

4+1

3+1

3+1

2+1

19

6

5+1

5+1

5+1

5+1

5+1

4+1

4+1

3+1

3+1

20

6

5+1

5+1

5+1

5+1

5+1

4+1

4+1

4+1

4+1

  • Clerics may take a Feat that allows them to gain proficiency in one martial weapon; otherwise, they're generally restricted to simple weapons.  All deities have a favored weapon for their followers, though clerics are not necessarily required to learn that weapon.  Clerics gain extra attacks per round starting at level 8.
  • Druids do not gain access to domain spells or granted powers; instead, they have their own special abilities that replace this extra spellcasting power.
  • Cleric Domains:  WotC Designer Sean Reynolds posted an example of how 3E clerics gain access to domain spells (on the 3E Message Board):
    • Example: You worship a fiery war god. Your domains are "Fire" and "War." A 3rd level cleric has X 1st level spells from the main list and Y 2nd level spells from the main list, plus one 1st level domain spell (which could be Burn Your Face from the Fire domain or Thump from the War domain) and one 2nd level domain spell (which could be Burn Your Face and Chest from the Fire domain or Big Thump from the War domain).
  • More about Cleric Spells:  TSR VP Ryan Dancey kindly answered questions about clerical spellcasting in 3E:
    • How many domains are there?  I count 23.
    • Do any of the domains have the same name as any of the current spheres?Yes.
    • Are there any spells that exist in more than one domain?  I don't think so.
    • How big is the generic spell list? What I mean is, what is the ballpark figure of the number of spells per level in this generic list? There are 25 spells in the 1st level "Cleric Spell List".  Some of those spells appear in domains. Some of the spells in Domains do not appear on the general "Cleric Spell List."  There are 9 spells in the 9th level "Cleric Spell List".  On very quick review, I found only two spells that also appeared in a domain.
    • I assume there are more spells per level at lower levels than at higher levels?  Yes.
    • Spell sources: Do all of them come from just the PHB or do they incorporate Tome of Magic and other sources?   There are spells from all over - including brand new spells.
    • Does the DMG address how to create "holy water"?  No.  That material appears in the PHB.  There are explicit instructions.
  • Wizard Spells in Cleric Domains?  Yup.  Some Cleric domains contain spells that normally only wizards can cast, according to WotC's Sean Reynolds.
  • More Cleric Info from Dragon #267:  3E Message Board poster Allister Huggins reminded me that I had only scratched the surface of the recent article about 3E clerics.  Here are some of the tidbits I left out:
    • Healing:  A cleric who swaps a spell in exchange for healing ability gains the power to cure d8 hp per level of the spell exchanged, plus 1 hp per cleric level, but with a cap based on the level of the spell swapped..
    • Extra Attacks:  Clerics gain extra attacks per round starting at 8th level.
    • Turning Undead:  Clerics will be limited in how many times per day they can use this power -- 3 plus their Charisma bonus per day.  However, if they so choose, they can make more than one attempt per combat.

The Gods of 3rd Edition

Deity Portfolio Alignment Domains

Hextor, God of Tyrany

Heironeous Valor LG Good, Law, War
Moradin Dwarves LG Earth, Good, Law, Protection
Yondalla Halflings LG Good, Law, Protection
Ehlonna Woodlands NG Animal, Good, Plant, Sun
Garl Glittergold Gnomes NG Good, Protection, Trickery
Pelor Sun NG Good, Healing, Strength, Sun
Corellon Larethian Elves CG Chaos, Good, Protection, War
Kord Strength CG Chaos, Good, Strength, Luck
Wee Jas Death & Magic LN Death, Law, Magic
St. Cuthbert Retribution LN Law, Strength, Protection, Destruction
Boccob Magic N Knowledge, Magic, Trickery
Fharlanghn Roads N Luck, Protection, Travel
Obad-Hai Nature N Air, Animal, Earth, Fire, Plant, Water
Olidammara Thieves CN Chaos, Luck, Trickery
Hextor Tyrany LE Destruction, Evil, Law, War
Nerull Death NE Death, Evil, Trickery
Vecna Secrets NE Evil, Knowledge, Magic
Erythnul Slaughter CE Chaos, Evil, Trickery, War
Gruumsh Orcs CE Chaos, Evil, War

  • Why will Forgotten Realms get new clerical domains while Living Greyhawk won't? "The Living Greyhawk campaign is supposed to stick to Core D&D (PH/DMG/MM) as much as possible, so we used the core domains. The official Living campaign will use those domains. However, there's no reason why your non-Living campaign can't use the domains that we create in the FR book."
  • What deity info will be provided in the Living Greyhawk Gazetteer? "The LGG will have all of the Greater, Intermediate, Lesser, and Demigods listed in the PGTGH, plus a few that were missed. They'll have a brief write-up of the god, the god's dogma, what clerics of that god do, and the domains."
  • Alignment of the Gods of Greyhawk (and 3E):  WotC VP Ryan Dancey talked about some of the alignment changes that have taken place in the move from 2E to 3E:
    • St. Cuthbert's LN alignment:  "The one of the most significant changes is altering St. Cuthbert to LN, and assigning Cuthbert the portfolio of "Retribution".  There were significant internal debates about this change, and both sides of the argument did an excellent job at presenting their various sides of the argument.  Cuthbert's portfolio provided an excellent template for a god of "Retribution" - not "revenge"; "Retribution" implies that justice is served in the end, regardless of whether that justice is good or evil.  We believe that this presentation of Cuthbert is true to the various expressions of the Cutherbertian faith in most of the existing published products, and jibes with his presentation as "LG (LN)" in The Adventure Begins."
    • Gruumsh's CE alignment:  "In 3e, the default alignment for Orcs is CE.  In our opinion, this alignment default represents the way that Orcs have been depicted in D&D products and in the way that they are primarily used by most DMs in play....  We wanted the Orcs creator god to track with the default Orc alignment, so Gruumsh appears as CE."
  • Ye Gods: The PHB will have sample gods drawn from the Greyhawk pantheon. What does a "deity stat block" look like? Anonymous to the rescue (Pelor symbol comes from Realm of the Purple Sage):

Deity: Pelor, God of the Sun
Alignment: Neutral Good
Domains: Good, Healing, Strength, Sun
Typical Worshippers: Rangers, Bards

Pelor (
pay-lore), god of the sun, is neutral good. His title is the Shining One. Pelor is the creator of many good things, a supporter of those in need, and an adversary of all that is evil. He is the most commonly worshipped deity among ordinary humans, and his priests are well received wherever they go. Rangers and bards are found among his worshipers. The domains he is associated with are Good, Healing, Strength, and Sun. The mace is his favored weapon.

Cleric Domains from Winter Fantasy

War Domain

Deities: Corellon Larethian, Erythnul, Gruumsh, Heironeous, Hextor
Sun Domain

Deities: Ehlonna, Pelor
Good Domain

Deities: Corellon Larethian, Ehlonna, Garl Glittergold, Heironeous, Kord, Moradin, Pelor, Yondalla

Granted Power:  Free Martial Weapon Proficiency (if necessary) and Weapon 
Focus with the deity's favored weapon. 

  • Corellon Larethian, long bow 
  • Erythnul, morningstar 
  • Gruumsh, spear (halfspear, shortspear, or longspear) 
  • Heironeous, long sword 
  • Hextor, great axe 
Granted Power:  Once per day the cleric can perform a greater turning against undead instead of a regular turning (or commanding) effect.  The greater turning is like a normal turning effect except that the undead creatures that would be turned are destroyed instead. Granted Power:  Cast good spells at +1 caster level.  (See list below.)
War Domain Spells

Level 1 Magic Weapon (weapon gains +1 bonus) 
Level 2 Spiritual Weapon (creates a magic weapon which attacks on its own) 
Level 3 Magic Vestment
Level 4 Divine Power
Level 5 Flame Strike
Level 6 Blade Barrier
Level 7 Power Word Stun
Level 8 Power Word Blind
Level 9 Power Word Kill
Sun Domain Spells

Level 1 Endure Elements (Ignore first 5 hp damage each round from cold or fire) 
Level 2 Heat Metal
Level 3 Searing Light
Level 4 Fire Shield
Level 5 Flame Strike
Level 6 Fire Seeds
Level 7 Sunray
Level 8 Sun Burst
Level 9 Prismatic Sphere
Good Domain Spells

Level 1 Protection from Evil
Level 2 Aid
Level 3 Magic Circle vs Evil
Level 4 Holy Smite (damages and blinds evil creatures) 
Level 5 Dispel Evil
Level 6 Blade Barrier
Level 7 Holy Word
Level 8 Holy Aura
Level 9 Summon Monster IX

More Cleric Domains from Winter Fantasy Convention

Air Domain

Deity: Obad-Hai
Granted Power: Turn earth creatures. Command air creatures. These powers work like Turn or Command Undead (limited number of attempts per day, modified for Charisma).

Air Domain Spells

  1. Obscuring mist
  2. Wind wall
  3. Gaseous Form
  4. Air Walk (tread on air as if solid ground; can climb at 45 degree angle)
  5. Control Winds
  6. Chain Lightning
  7. Weather Control
  8. Whirlwind
  9. Elemental Swarm (Air)

Animal Domain

Deities: Ehlonna, Obad-Hai
Granted Power: Cast animal friendship once per day. Gain a Skill called "Knowledge (Nature)".



Animal Domain Spells

  1. Calm animals
  2. Hold animal
  3. Dominate animal
  4. Repel Vermin
  5. Commune with Nature
  6. Anti-Life Shell
  7. Animal Shapes
  8. Creeping Doom
  9. Shapechange

Chaos Domain

Deities: Corellon Larethian, Erythnul, Gruumsh, Kord, Olidammara

Granted Power: Cast Chaos spells at +1 caster level.



Chaos Domain Spells

  1. Protection from Law
  2. Shatter
  3. Magic Circle vs. Law
  4. Chaos Hammer
  5. Dispel Law
  6. Animate Objects
  7. Word of Chaos
  8. Cloak of Chaos
  9. Summon Monster IX

Death Domain

Deities: Nerull, Wee Jas

Granted Power: Death touch once per day: as a spell like ability, touch a living creature (use rules for touch spells). Roll 1d6 per cleric's level; if the total equals at least the creatures current hit points, it dies.

Death Domain Spells

  1. Cause Fear
  2. Death Knell (kill dying creature and temporarily gain d8 HP, +2 str, and +1 caster level)
  3. Animate Dead
  4. Death Ward
  5. Slay Living
  6. Create Undead
  7. Destruction
  8. Create Greater Undead
  9. Wail of the Banshee


Still More Cleric Domains from Winter Fantasy Convention

Healing Domain

Deity: Pelor
Granted Power: Cast healing spells at +1 caster level.
 

Healing Domain Spells

  1. Cure Light Wounds 
  2. Cure Moderate Wounds 
  3. Cure Serious Wounds 
  4. Cure Critical Wounds 
  5. Healing Circle 
  6. Heal 
  7. Regenerate 
  8. Mass Heal 
  9. True Resurrection 

Knowledge Domain

Deities: Boccob, Vecna
Granted Power: All Knowledge skills are class skills. Cast divinations at +1 caster level.

Knowledge Domain Spells

  1. Detect Secret Passages 
  2. Detect Thoughts 
  3. Clairaudiance/Clairvoyance 
  4. Divinations 
  5. True Seeing 
  6. Find the Path 
  7. Legend Lore 
  8. Discern Location 
  9. Foresight 

Law Domain

Deities: St Cuthbert, Heironeous, Hextor, Moradin, Wee Jas, Yondalla

Granted Power: Cast Law spells at +1 caster level.
 

Law Domain Spells

  1. Protection from Chaos 
  2. Calm Emotions 
  3. Magic Circle vs Chaos 
  4. Order's Wrath 
  5. Dispel Chaos 
  6. Hold Monster 
  7. Dictum 
  8. Shield of Law 
  9. Summon Monster IX 

Luck Domain

Deities: Fharlanghn, Kord, Olidammara

Granted Power: Good Fortune: The ability to reroll one roll 
that you have just made; taking the result of the re-roll (even if it's worse). Usable once/day.

Luck Domain Spells

  1. Entropic Shield 
  2. Aid 
  3. Protection from Elements 
  4. Free Action 
  5. Break Enchantment 
  6. Mislead 
  7. Spell Turning 
  8. Holy Aura 
  9. Miracle 

Even More Cleric Domains from Winter Fantasy Convention

Magic Domain

Deity: Boccob, Vecna, Wee Jas

Granted Power: Use scrolls, wands and other devices with spell completion or magic word activation as a wizard of one-half cleric level (at least first level). For the purpose of using a scroll or other magic device, if the cleric is also a wizard, actual wizard levels and these effective wizards levels stack.

Magic Domain Spells

  1. Nystul's Undetectable Aura
  2. Identify
  3. Dispel Magic
  4. Imbue with Spell Ability
  5. Spell Resistance
  6. Anti-Magic Field
  7. Spell Turning
  8. Greater Spell Immunity
  9. Mordenkainen's Disjunction

Travel Domain

Deities: Fharlanghn

Granted Power: For a total of 1 round/level per day, you can act normally regardless of magic effects that impede movement (similar to the effect of the spell free action). This effect occurs automatically as soon as it applies, lasts until it runs out or is no longer needed, and can operate multiple times per day (up to the total daily limit). Wilderness Lore is a class skill.

Travel Domain Spells

  1. Expeditious Retreat
  2. Locate Object
  3. Fly
  4. Dimension Door
  5. Teleport
  6. Find the Path
  7. Teleport without Error
  8. Phase Door
  9. Astral Projection

Protection Domain

Deities: Corellon Larethian, St. Cuthbert, Fharlanghn, Garl Glittergoild, Moradin, Yondalla

Granted Power: Protective Ward: a spell-like ability to grant someone a resistance bonus on her next saving throw equal to the cleric's level. This is an abjuration effect with a duration of 1 hour. Usable once per day.
 
Protection Domain Spells

  1. Sanctuary
  2. Shield Other - Damage to other equally divided between target and caster while spell is in effect (1 hour/level)
  3. Protection from Elements
  4. Spell Immunity
  5. Spell Resistance
  6. Anti-Magic Field
  7. Repulsion
  8. Mind Blank
  9. Prismatic Sphere

Strength Domain

Deities: St. Cuthbert, Kord, Pelor


Granted Power:
Feat of Strength: The supernatural ability to gain a magical bonus to strength equal to the cleric's level. Activating the power is a free action, it lasts one round, and it's usable once per day.

Strength Domain Spells

  1. Endure Elements
  2. Strength
  3. Magic Vestment
  4. Spell Immunity
  5. Righteous Might
  6. Stoneskin
  7. Bigby's Grasping Hand
  8. Bigby's Clenched Fist
  9. Bigby's Crushing Hand

Plant Domain

Deities: Ehlonna, Obad-Hai

Granted Power: Command plant creatures as an evil cleric commands undead. Knowledge (nature) is a class skill.

Plant Domain Spells

  1. Entangle
  2. Barkskin
  3. Plant Growth
  4. Control Plants
  5. Wall of Thorns
  6. Repel Wood
  7. Changestaff
  8. Command Plants
  9. Stalker

Trickery Domain

Deities: Boccob, Erythnul, Garl Glittergold, Olidammara, Nerull

Granted Power: Bluff, Disguise and Hide are class skills.


Trickery Domain Spells

  1. Change Self
  2. Invisibility - Creature invisible; 10/min. per level or until it attacks
  3. Nondetection
  4. Confusion
  5. False Vision
  6. Mislead
  7. Screen
  8. Polymorph any Object
  9. Time Stop 

Water Domain

Deities: Obad Hai

Granted Power: Turn fire creatures as a good cleric turns undead. Command water creatures as an evil cleric commands undead.

Water Domain Spells

  1. Obscuring Mist
  2. Fog Cloud
  3. Water Breathing
  4. Control Water
  5. Ice Storm
  6. Cone of Cold
  7. Acid Fog
  8. Horrid Wilting
  9. Elemental Swarm 

Yet Even Still More Cleric Domains from Winter Fantasy

Destruction Domain

Deities: St. Cuthbert, Hextor

Granted Power: Smite: make a single melee attack with a +4 attack bonus and a damage bonus equal to your cleric level (if you hit). You must declare the smite before making the attack. Usable once/day.

Destruction Domain Spells

  1. Inflict Light Wounds - Touch attack, 1d8+1/level damage (max +5)
  2. Shatter
  3. Contagion
  4. Inflict Critical Wounds - 4d8+1/level (max +20)
  5. Circle of Doom
  6. Harm
  7. Disintegrate
  8. Earthquake
  9. Implosion

Earth Domain

Deities: Moradin, Obad-Hai

Granted Power: Turn air creatures as a good cleric turns undead. Command
earth creatures as an evil cleric commands undead. Use these abilities a total number of times per day equal to 3 plus your Charisma modifier.

Earth Domain Spells

  1. Magical Stone
  2. Soften Earth or Stone
  3. Stone Shape
  4. Spike Stones
  5. Wall of Stone
  6. Stoneskin
  7. Earthquake
  8. Iron Body
  9. Elemental Swarm

Fire Domain

Deities: Obad Hai

Granted Power: Turn water creatures as a good cleric turns undead. Command fire creatures as an evil cleric commands undead. Use these abilities a total number of times per day equal to 3 plus your Charisma modifier.

Fire Domain Spells

  1. Burning Hands
  2. Produce Flame
  3. Resist Elements - (fire only)
  4. Wall of Fire
  5. Fire Shield
  6. Fire Seeds
  7. Fire Storm
  8. Incendiary Cloud
  9. Elemental Swarm

Evil Domain

Deities: Hextor, Nerull, Vecna, Erythnul, Gruumsh
Granted Power:  Cast evil spells at +1 caster level
Evil Domain Spells

Level 1 Protection from Good
Level 2 Desecrate
Level 3 Magic Circle vs Good
Level 4 Unholy Blight 
Level 5 Dispel Good
Level 6 Create Undead
Level 7 Blasphemy
Level 8 Unholy Aura
Level 9 Summon Monster IX

Psionics:

  • Psionics will be only touched upon in the core books, but will receive full treatment in its own book later.
  • Psionics: Ryan Dancey addressed the issue of psionics in 3E on the official message board: "As described in the FAQ, psionics are not in the core books, but there will be a separate volume that reintegrates Psionics with 3e sometime in 2001. Work on that book has not even begun, as far as I know. Also, I do not necessarily think that we will take the 2e version of psionics and try to make it the basis of the 3e version; there are so many problems with the 2e version that in the end it may be best to scrap, and restart with a whole new approach to the problem."
  • Psionics = Magic? Playtester John Troy elaborates: "There IS an OPTIONAL rule in the DMG that says DMs can say Psionics are a different form of power and will not be affected by Anti-Magic, and they even classify the powers as seperate, so don't fret. But for the core rules, to keep things balanced and protect Psionics from being too powerful, they treat all Psionic effects as standard, and leave it up to the DM." 
  • Cordell will Blast Your Mind: Rumor has it that WotC's Bruce Cordell is working on the 3E psionics book. He's an ideal candidate for the project, as he wrote The Illithiad, which dealt with the masters of psionics, the mind flayers.
  • Cordell on Psionics: Planewalker.com has a brief interview with WotC designer Bruce Cordell. Cordell is authoring the 3E Psionics book, and mentions that project as well as other interesting subjects.


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